Category: Black Community

Urban Redevelopment Across the Midwest

Introduction

There is a renaissance occurring across the Midwest with the miracle in Cincinnati’s Over-The-Rhine and now moving to Gary, Indiana’s central business district. Gary once a large and prosperous. One hundred years ago Gary, was a new settlement on the south shore of Lake Michigan nicknamed the “city of the century.” Gary was founded and funded by the industrial colossus U.S. Steel—chairman Elbert H. Gary, for whom the town is named.

Classic Rust Belt

Today Gary is a Rust Belt city with a predominantly African-American working class population points to its perception not as an historic boomtown, but a city left reeling when the manufacturing left. Gary stand as a model for the failing Midwestern industrial town  with white flight and the disorderly departure of industry in the later half of the 20th century resulted in a lack of jobs and development. But the promise of the city and community needs vision for revival that could apply to other working class cities on the ropes.

Urban Renaissance

There is today a focused on blight busting and targeted development, attempting to inject optimism back into the town and its citizens. A number of new community initiatives and institutions, including ArtHouse, run by Chicago’s Theaster Gates, are using art as a catalyst for urban renaissance.

Francine Anderson

Francine Anderson is the youngest in a family of 5.  er father migrated to Chicago from Greenwood, Mississippi.  Her mother migrated to Chicago from Brookhaven, Mississippi.  Both were fleeing the racism, violence, and lack of opportunity that plagued the south. Francine worked in corporate finance as a financial analyst after completing her BA in Finance at Clark Atlanta University.  She later worked as an Illinois Realtor while investing in properties in Chicago’s Englewood and Washington Park neighborhoods.

Lakichay Nadirah Muhammad

Lakichay Nadirah Muhammad affectionately known as “The Queen of Self Improvement” and “The Wellness Angel” has an extensive background in the healing arts. This international bestselling author, speaker, earth steward and community leader is committed to the awakening and refinement of the indigenous family. With an extensive background and training in the world of Real Estate Investing, Philanthropy, and Community Building this wife and mother is able to effectively marry her skills to aid in the transformative rebirth for individuals, families and communities.

More Gold Investors, LLC

Enter More Gold Investors, LLC to put their own brand of redevelopment on downtown Gary. More Gold Investors consist of a pair of highly skilled and experienced real estate developers that have combined forces to bring the redevelopment of 624 Broadway with approximately 6,250 square foot retail development space.  The project is located on Gary’s main downtown street, Broadway, and is walking distance from City Hall, the Metra Train Station, US Steel, and the city’s minor league baseball stadium. The project site is on the west side of Broadway Street, midblock, near the Centier Bank Building.

The Convergence of Locavesting and CrowdInvesting

When we look into the investment portfolios of most individual investors we will find stocks and bonds of large multinational companies that very often send jobs and profits overseas. The new retail investor class that crowdinvesting creates is very cash rich and rarely finds itself being invested in local businesses that as stated above are the economic drivers of communities. How do we change that dynamic? How do we channel more capital to productive use—to the small businesses that create jobs, spur innovation and build strong local economies? Well, crowdinvesting is the vehicle that will be able to transfer this capital to small local businesses and real estate development.

Delivering the Gold in Commercial Real Estate

Introduction

Black women are the fastest growing demographic of business owners and here are three Black women that are moving into the domain of commercial real estate what is considered by many to be the especially in commercial real estate, which has been called ‘the least diverse industry on the planet.’ Real estate ownership is also key to building inter-generational wealth. So many of our inner-city neighborhoods have suffered from divestment and benign neglect for decades after the erosion of the urban industrial manufacturing base. But Midwestern cities are making a comeback led by ambitious and visionary Black women that are taking real estate development to a new level.

Capitalizing on Inner-City Redevelopment

Gary much like Detroit is experiencing an influx of redevelopment capital for major players and these Black women are taking advantage of this urban renaissance by purchasing buildings on the periphery of the major development that will allow them to take advantage of the rising tide of urban development. There are using a new tool called crowdinvesting which became legal in May of 2016 and allows anyone rich or poor to take advantage of real estate development as an investor with as little a $100 investment.

The Project

The commercial project includes 6,250 square feet of retail space that includes office spaces in the basement.  It is expected to be renovated, operational, and leased by 2019. Francine Anderson and Lakichay Nadirah Co-Founder of More Gold Investors And their goal is to serve their community by providing resources and trainings that result in community revitalization and development which will ultimately lead to a more sustainable and enriched community.

Takeaway

Buy The Block    is the only Black female owner real estate platforms in the United States and it provide the infrastructure for the African-American community to shift some of the $1.3 trillion we have in purchasing power to small Black-owned businesses, inner-city real estate development and tech businesses that lack access to capital to grow and prosper. Buy The Block is open to any sort of project as long as there is a real estate component, whether residential, business or industrial projects. 

Influencer Marketing on Twitter

Introduction

Influencer/Blogging marketing involves a collaboration between crowdfunding campaigns and a select number of experts in a relevant field who have a large following on social media specifically Twitter for this post. Influencer marketing distinguishes individuals who have a significant influence on a potential group customer. When the right influencers endorse your product or brand, it can create a huge impact!

The way audiences interact with content continues to shift, making influencer/blogger marketing an even more effective and efficient model to exciting and engaging your crowd. Millennials purchase based on endorsements, reviews and ultimately trust. They view authenticity as one of the most, if not the most, essential elements of purchasing. For example, 33% of millennials read blogs and expert reviews before buying a product, so it makes sense for crowdfunding campaigns to highlight these expert opinions.

A quick review of your Twitter feed will show that people don’t always flock to companies for information about their products and services. Instead, they’re seeking influencers – popular, personable, and independent content creators who aren’t afraid to share opinions on social media. More than 90% of consumers trust earned press – characterized as word-of-mouth and recommendations from trustworthy sources – more than all other types of advertising

As founders building crowd investing campaigns how do we harness the power of earned media through Twitter influencers/bloggers to build our engaged and excited group of investors. These are the steps we use to tap the influencer/blogger marketing on Twitter

DEVELOP INFLUENCER MARKETING GOALS

  1. Expand brand awareness- Influencers have the power to rapidly increase your brand awareness because they have an established and engaged audience.
  2. Generate leads – A simple way to implement influencers into your marketing plans is to partner with them to share your brand’s blogs, features, products.
  3. Check influencer contribution – It is essential to quantify the overall reach and impression of your content. Use these numbers to calculate the ROI of your campaign by different parameters such as followers gained.

IDENTIFY INFLUENCERS

Identify relevant influencers/bloggers who are affiliated with your industry. Find your target audience and the influencers’ followers should be mutually inclusive. You can use Twitter Advanced Search to search Twitter and keep an eye on specific hashtags, mentions, and conversations about your brand.

BUILD RELATIONSHIPS WITH INFLUENCERS

After identifying several leading influencers/bloggers, reach out! Rather than sending a cold email with your interest, go the extra mile by engaging and showcasing the fact that you have mutual interests.

  • Start following them on Twitter and start a casual conversation
  • Retweet their content to introduce them to your audience
  • Discuss something they have tweeted recently
  • Share their blog posts on Twitter
  • Connect on other social media platforms
  • Offer to write a guest post on their blog
  • Send products to them as free samples to review

Take time to source valuable influencers/bloggers and cultivate a professional relationship. When trust is established, and you’re confident that there is a mutual fit, you’re in a high position to launch an influencer/blogger marketing campaign.

DEVISE A MARKETING STRATEGY

From creating brand awareness to boosting sales, influencer/blogger marketing on Twitter has the potential to drive amazing results to your crowdfunding campaign.

  • Keep these things in mind before creating an influencer marketing campaign:
  • Prepare a list of leading influencers/bloggers you are in touch with
  • Define your target audience and goals for the campaign
  • Create a call-to-action and several achievable deliverables
  • Come up with a hashtag for the campaign and keywords
  • Research what your competitors are doing and what they have done previously

Going through this process will help clearly define what you want to get out of an upcoming campaign and ensure that you can meet those goals.

START RUNNING YOUR INFLUENCER/BLOGGER CAMPAIGNS ON TWITTER

After developing a clear strategy concerning the influencers you are going to work with, start implementing your campaign. Have the content of your campaign ready and prepare the tools your influencer/bloggers need to succeed before the campaign launch.

TAKEAWAY

Measuring the outcome of the Twitter Influencer/blogger marketing campaign using keywords and anchor hashtag from the campaign to track its overall reach and performance. Use a Twitter monitoring/social listening tool to do the individual analysis:

  • check the retweet count
  • calculate impressions/reach
  • gauge other relevant data-oriented results.

Not only will it help you judge the overall efficiency of your present campaign, but it will also let you identify leading influencers for your next campaign. This will be vital to maintaining an effective and efficient process for developing and implementing a Twitter Influencer/Blogger marketing campaign.

The Dearth of Black Farmers

Introduction 

Today in Illinois there are only 59 farms owned and operated by by African-Americans across the state, down from 123 in 1997, according to newly revised figures from a 2002 census. As farming has become a big business, it has become one of the least diverse businesses around. Whites operate more than 72,000 Illinois farms, Hispanics 488 and those of other ethnicity 219 combined.

The Rapidly Disappearing Black Farmer

In 1920, Illinois had 892 black farmers, and African-Americans owned 14 percent of the nation’s farmland. Now they hold less than 1 percent. The same pressure to consolidate that has reduced the ranks of farmers for the past century is making any turnaround unlikely. The number of black farmers in Illinois, currently less than one in 1,000, appears destined to eventually hit zero.

The numbers are dwindling across much of the Midwest, according to the Agriculture Department census, which was updated in April. Iowa has 31 black farmers, down from 40 in 1997. Indiana has 55, down from 61. Several states, such as North Dakota, list no black farmers at all. A few states reported small gains, but the numbers are tiny across the region.

Understanding the History of The Black Farmer

The scarcity of African-American farmers stems from a troubled history as well. Racial discrimination played a big role in driving blacks off their land in southern states. During the Great Migration that began with World War I, blacks moved north for jobs in industrial cities, not the hinterlands.

For sharecroppers, farming was associated with the poverty and backbreaking labor of slavery. For those who owned land, unequal treatment made it difficult to retain the property and earn a living. The Agriculture Department acknowledged that it had abused black farmers for generations. USDA agents approved only a fraction of financing requests, delayed loans until after the planting season and withheld other key payments.

Why is this Important to You

Why does any of this information matter to the most urbanized people in the world. Well it matter on many levels and we are going to explore some of these in this post. Today in most inner-city African-American communities are what the USDA classify as “Urban Food Deserts”. These urban food deserts have similar characteristics: Food deserts can be described as geographic areas where residents’ access to affordable, healthy food options (especially fresh fruits and vegetables) is restricted or nonexistent due to the absence of grocery stores within convenient travelling distance.   

The Economics of Urban Food Deserts

Economic forces have driven grocery stores out of many cities in recent years, making them so few and far between that an individual’s food shopping trip may require taking several buses or trains. In suburban and rural areas, public transportation is either very limited or unavailable, with supermarkets often many miles away from people’s homes.

What are Urban Food Deserts

The other defining characteristic of food deserts is socio-economic: that is, they are most commonly found in communities of color and low-income areas (where many people don’t have cars). Studies have found that wealthy districts have three times as many supermarkets as poor ones, and that white neighborhoods contain an average of four times as many supermarkets as predominantly black ones do, and that grocery stores in African-American communities are usually smaller with less selection.

People’s choices about what to eat are severely limited by the options available to them and what they can afford—and many food deserts contain an overabundance of fast food chains selling cheap “meat” and dairy-based foods that are high in fat, sugar and salt. Processed foods such as snack cakes, chips and soda typically sold by corner delis, convenience stores and liquor stores are usually just as unhealthy.

Urban Crowdinvesting and Entrepreneurship

Crowdinvesting has the ability to close the African-American urban-rural divide by allowing inner-city entrepreneurs to create local food stores that are able to provide healthy food choices to people living in urban food deserts and it opens new markets to the dying Black farmer.  

Roots & Vine Produce and Café is a unique and innovative new concept that is actively pursuing solutions to social justice, food justice and Black farmer issues from both the supply and demand side by creating a brand that addresses the needs of both of these groups of Black people using market based strategies that will create jobs, revenue, health and wealth for both inner-city urban food desert dwellers and the rapidly disappearing Black Farmer.

Takeaway

Please visit Roots and Vines offer as they sprout up in food deserts across the country and will quickly make the new startup a household name. Inserting themselves into blighted communities and providing fresh produce, bulk dry goods and essentials in areas that need it most and creating new markets for Black farmers.  

The Black Panther Movie and Black Crowd Investing

Introduction 

Two months before the premiere of the Marvel’s Black Panther I was invited to take part in a premiere event that was sure to please. I was excited to meet the many Black business owners and professionals in the Louisville area that were going to participate on this project. It seemed that everyone was a buzz about the opening of the first Marvel movie that featured a Black director, predominantly Black cast, and a $200 million budget. To date the movie has lived up to all of the hype. The movie has been a box office smash with receipts in excess of $400 million already.

Crowdfunding for a Cause 

I came across an article by Adrienne Gibbs that brought a smile to my face as a crowdinvesting consultant. The Title of the article was Why Is ‘Black Panther’ Selling Out? Activists, Churches, Schools Buy Thousands Of Tickets. The article describes the in vivid detail how the Black community was willing and able to rally around a cause both politically and economically to achieve a goal. We showed the world, but most importantly our community, the economic power that our community wields in America and globally.

The Crowd Economy In Black America

The article chronicles how the movement began with a single #Hashtag from Harlem with the #BlackPantherChallenge, Frederick Joseph started a GoFundMe page to take some neighborhood kids to the movie. As I read on my heart began to pump faster and harder as I imagined the day in the Black community when we will #InvestBlack, #BuyBlack, #BankBlack and build #BlackWealth.  My hope is that the example of “Black Panther”would start a Black economic movement that would lead our community to commit billions of dollars to Buy the Block a black owned real estate crowdinvesting platform.

Seeing the Future of Black Crowdinvesting 

I thought of the day when business owners and other high net worth Black people would pool their capital into impact investment funds and invest a portion of their portfolios alongside non-accredited community investors to renovate urban commercial corridors and bring back the dense urban live-work-shop-play spaces, not seen since a time before urban renewal destroyed these economic community anchors. Crowd investing and impact investment can create communities where we #InvestBlack which then makes #BuyBlack make sense because there is the economic benefit in building #BlackWealth through entrepreneurship and real estate development.

My goal is that the next time a big-budget movie featuring a Black director and Black cast premieres it will come from majority Black-owned studio that was financed by crowdinvesting and is staffed by Black people that are trying to make their mark in Atlanta the Black Hollywood. The theaters that we buyout for the next premiere will be Black owned and in the urban core in our communities, so that we are employing people from the community.

Takeaway 

According to the article “Black Panther” is a game changer when it comes to imagery and modernity. Also, Black Panther ups the ante because many of the behind the scenes people are Black, as are the leading actors.  The political and economic impact of this one major studio blockbuster film “Black Panther” has had on the Black community across the country is immense.

Let’s make“Black Panther” the driver of a new movement to #InvestBlack with Buy the Block  #BuyBlack where you invested your dollars and build #BlackWealth. We now have a model that provides proof of concept for the power of a united community economic effort using crowdfunding. We have a Black owned crowdinvesting platform so instead of using GoFundMe campaigns to raise charity funds let’s take the #BuyTheBlockChallenge to invest in our communities and be the change we want to see!

Crowd Investing Through The Black Church

The Black Church as a Wealth Building Catalyst

As I was conducting research for this article I found many people that have written in the negative about the Black Church and its relationship to the poor Black community that supports it financially. The Black Church is big business, whether one likes to admit it or not, this is a simple fact. The church like any other organization must operate along sound business principles or risk becoming insolvent. LiveSteez research shows that Black churches, in aggregate, have collected more than $420 billion in tithes and donations since 1980.

That figure is staggering when analyzed alongside demographic data about concentrated poverty, low home ownership, low business ownership, access to capital for businesses, and almost zero in accumulated wealth in the Black community. Annually Black Churches rack in over $14 billion tax-free, yet this demographic data has grown worse as time moves forward into the future. I live in a Black neighborhood and I see a church on many corners (sometimes 3-4 per block), a liquor store, and businesses that aren’t owned by Blacks.

These businesses that are not Black-owned plague our communities in many ways. The majority of people that live in the Black community don’t own the place where they reside. This data in comparison to the amount of money that flows into the Black church annually has brought me to this reality as a Black crowd investment consultant that was raised in the Black church. My goal is to help the people in my community build wealth and community equity using Regulation Crowdfunding and impact investing. The Black Church must play a significant role in making this goal a reality.

The Black Church as an Economic Center

So, before this becomes another article on how corrupt the Black church has become let me state for the record I strongly believe that the Black church as an entity has a substantial role to play in community economic development through the creation of Black-owned businesses, increasing home ownership, developing inner-city commercial real estate and increasing Black wealth. Why do I believe this, first because I have met and spoken in depth with Black Pastors that care deeply for their communities and their people, but don’t have any workable solutions to drive economic development forward?

Second, there are much easier ways for people to make a living than  pastoring inner-city churches that were devastated by the “Great Recession” and are struggling to keep their doors open for members. The Black church provides hope and direction for tens of millions of Black people in the 120 largest urban centers. The people are going to church and the funds are there, so let’s bring the crowd and the investment capital together through Regulation Crowdfunding platforms like Buy the Block and begin the process of #InvestingBlack.

Black Churches and Black Investment

I urge all inner-city Black churches to use this unique opportunity to redirect the fortunes of their community. Rethinking the inner-city in economic and social terms will be uncomfortable for those who have devoted years to only social causes and who view profit and business in general with suspicion. The private sector, government, inner-city residents, and community-based organizations all have vital new roles to play in revitalizing the economy of the inner-city using Regulation Crowdfunding. The African-American Church, business people, entrepreneurs, and investors must assume a leadership role and community activists, social service providers, and government bureaucrats must support them in our goal to transform these communities using market principles.

Takeaways

When such Black church-based developments take place in low-income neighborhoods, they will increase property values, attract new residents and become magnets for diverse businesses and better-paying jobs. Church-based business enterprises will help rebuild the community’s social infrastructure and provide such much-needed values-based services as child care, youth development, elder care and substance abuse counseling along with other economic drivers. These activities tend to lead to improved schools, better public safety, and an enhanced quality-of-life. From this type of community economic development, everyone—those living in the area and those in surrounding communities—benefits.

Black People and the Crowd Economy

Introduction

I read Antonio Moore’s article Black Wealth Hardly Exists, Even When You Include NBA, NFL And Rap Stars and found it to be spot-on in its analysis of the current situation of the average Black family and their lack of wealth the dearth of Black home ownership and a true path forward. One of the first things that struck me in his article was the fact the so many Black celebrities fame and wealth are talked about in the news and on social media, but only upon in-depth research are you able to find the reality of Black social and economic daily life. I think about the Black people that I know are on the front line of this battle for economic empowerment and the pursuit of the American dream of home ownership.

As I read the data that is out there about the poor and declining state of Black American and the inner-cities. As I live in one of those neighborhoods on a daily basis that lacks access to fresh healthy food options, pharmacy’s, and desirable retail option. Home ownership is dismally low, crime is high and educational attainment is relatively low. These dark and gloomy social realities at their root stem from poverty, which is a of wealth. I have written in the past about how redlining and other discriminatory local, state, and federal government policies have retarded the development of Black wealth and how it will take decades to right these social and economic wrongs. But we have to live today and take care of our families. So we need to build strategies in flight to turn this tide on the bleak realities of Black wealth in 2018.

Black Impact Investing

I think of another writer that is deeply engaged in the fight for the growth and development of Black wealth and that is Dr. Michael Isimbabi author of the seminal book Pooling Our Resources to Foster Black Progress: An Entrepreneurship and Impact Investing Framework that outlines things we, as a community can do to pool our immense financial resources to organically build our communities and inter-generational Black wealth through entrepreneurship and impact investing. One of the areas of overlap I find between Mr. Moore and Dr. Isimbabi is the desire to tap the high net worth celebrities to have them pool their wealth in the form of impact investment funds that would provide professional management, diversity, and focused investment objective on Black business creation and real estate investment.

Buy The Block

Lynn P. the Black female serial entrepreneur that raised over $110,000 to build out the first Black owned real estate crowdfunding platform Buy The Block that provides a super low entry fee of $100 that lowers the barrier of entry for many of the people in the Black community to make their first foray into the world of real estate investing. This Serial Entrepreneur founded Buy the Block in a tool shed in Cincinnati in 2013. The company allowed her to couple her two passions, real estate investing and teaching others the art and science of real estate investment,  into a seamless online crowd investing experience for the Black community. Buy the Block has solved two of the major issues of the Black community.

The first is access to capital for businesses and real estate development and the second is an investment platform with a low barrier to entry to facilitate the building of community equity and Black wealth at the same time. Buy The Block now serves investors and developers all over the US and is thrilled to be a part of the global crowd investing and alternative finance industry.By bringing investors together with entrepreneurs, we are not just building stronger communities; we are building wealthier communities. In that wealth lies the only real independence.

Black people in the United States have a combined purchasing power of $1.3 trillion which would make us the 13th largest economy in the world, yet our wealth is encroaching zero as our income and education attainment continue to rise. We must as a community embrace the crowd economy pool our immense financial resources through impact investing, crowd investing, and entrepreneurship to create companies and build inter-generational wealth. Please Mr. Moore, and Dr. Isimbabi. Visit  Buy The Block  today and Join the Movement.  

Crowdinvesting for Black Athletes Building Community Building Wealth

Introduction

You have read the headlines time and time again. “athletes make too much money”,  “those guys are overpaid”, but Are we asking the wrong question in relation to the NFL and NBA. These are two industries where Black professionals make at the very least on average over $1 million annually.  There are 32 NFL teams with 53 roster spots each, which means 1,696 NFL players and there are 30 NBA teams with 15 roster spots each, totaling 450 NBA players at any given moment. According to Forbes on average, NBA players make $5.15 million and NFL players make $1.9 million per year  Blacks make up at least 80 percent or 1187 NFL Millionaires and 80 percent or 315 NBA Millionaires annually.  

Professional Sports a Cash Cow

The explosion of television and marketing dollars flowing to professional sports teams is pumping players salaries to unprecedented heights and has ushered in a gold rush of capital, fame, and influence in the age of social media where a LeBron James Tweet is worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. There has never been a more lucrative time to be in the sports agency business either as the sports industry has mushroomed to dizzying heights in players salaries, the value of endorsement packages, and management fees.

The Sports Agency Industry

The firms featured in Forbes’ ranking of the most valuable sports agencies have negotiated a collective $37.6 billion in current professional athlete contracts, netting themselves more than $1.85 billion in commissions. Sports agency is an industry where professional Black athletes have the ability to choose their sports agent these numbers should be reflective of the 70 percent of NFL players and 80 percent of NBA players they can potentially represent.

We should dominate this multi-billion dollar industry, but we don’t.  This should be the question we are asking in 2018. The next question we should be asking is where are these millionaires investing their $2 billion dollars annually? According to a 2009 Sports Illustrated article, 78% of National Football League (NFL) players are either bankrupt or are under financial stress within two years of retirement and an estimated 60% of National Basketball Association players go bankrupt within five years after leaving their sport.

Charting a New Direction

The information above leads me to some questions. Should there be a concerted effort for Black athletes to employ Black sports agencies to manage their business affairs? Should Black players, agents, coaches and upper management make an organized play to exert more influence over the flow of the billions of dollars in professional sports? Sports is a multi-billion dollar industry where the hired help is overwhelmingly Black, but the fans and owners are mostly white how do we exert more pressure on the two leagues to empower our community?

Situation Analysis

With Black home ownership at a 50 year low and Black wealth heading towards zero in the near future what type of social and economic strategies can be put in place to turn the tide on these dismal statistics. I suggest that our Black athletes create impact investment funds that are managed by experienced and capable Black finance professionals. These funds would provide professional management for these professional athletes and targeted investments in building a stronger economy in Black communities through real estate development, retail, and the tech industry to name a few areas where our pooled resources can make a positive impact in our communities.       

Today, some of the world’s most respected and successful figures are in the tech industry. They include the entrepreneurs who have developed innovative products and launched industry-changing companies and the venture capitalists who provide capital and assistance to help these companies thrive. But while the technology sector continues to flourish, and its luminaries are seen as role models, the industry as a whole is suffering from a lack of diversity that has undermined its ability to fully realize its transformative potential.

The Need for Black Capital Aggregation

There were thousands of venture deals minted from 2012 to 2014, so few black women founders raised money that, statistically speaking, the number might as well be zero. (The exact number is 24 out of 10,238, or just 0.2 percent.) Of those few that have raised money, the average amount of funding its $36,000. That’s compared to the typical startup, typically founded by a white male, that typically fails. These manage to raise an average of $1.3 million in venture funding.

This disparity comes even as black women today comprise the fastest-growing group of entrepreneurs in the US, with over 1.5 million businesses—a 322 percent increase since 1997. These businesses generate over $44 billion a year in revenue. Yet in the tech world, investors aren’t taking a risk on startups run by black women. I venture to say that these are the questions we should be asking about the NFL and NBA in relations to the Black political economy that operates within the United States.

Takeaway

Black people in the United States have made extraordinary gains in education, industry and even increasing salaries with over 8 million Black families making over $75,000 annually, but home ownership is dismal and on average we have little to no wealth when compared to our White counterparts. One way to increase our wealth both on the individual and community level is to pool our tremendous financial assets through the “Crowd Economy”. The crowd economy provides a basis for more efficient use of resources, but also reduces the strain on the environment and ecosystem services that are fast depleting.  The crowd economy will allow regulation crowdfunding platforms to allow regular citizens to invest in build economic capacity at the community while running capital parallel to the diversified professionally managed community focused impact investment funds of wealthier professional athletes.

Redlining: The Genesis of the “Hood”

Introduction to Redlining

Redlining, is an unethical and discriminatory practice that was committed by banks and other financial service providers (e.g., mortgage companies and insurance companies). These businesses either make it impossible or nearly impossible for people living in low-income neighborhoods in the ‘inner city’ to obtain a home loan, mortgage or other financial product because of a “perceived” high default rate in the neighborhood. The practice is called ‘redlining’ because in the past some of these financial institutions would literally draw a red line on a map demarcating neighborhoods where they would not provide services.

The History of Redlining

This discriminatory policy that continues to impact inner-cities was started in 1933, to relieve housing shortage the United States faced with after the “Great Depression.” The federal government began a program explicitly designed to increase — and segregate — America’s housing stock. The housing programs begun under the New Deal that was commensurate with to a “state-sponsored system of segregation.” There are far reaching social and economic consequences that resulted from this form of government sponsored segregation.

The Impact of Redlining on America

Redlining had the effect of artificially depressing the housing prices in “inner-city” and artificially increasing the prices of homes in the suburban areas of cities. The government for all intents financed the creation of white suburban middle-class families and sealed the fate of African-American families to live in inner-city neighborhoods that were denied accesses to mortgages, insurances. The Federal Housing Administration, which was established in 1934 and the Veterans Administration followed suite, which furthered the segregation efforts by refusing to insure mortgages in and near African-American neighborhoods.     

These decades-old housing policies have had a lasting impact on American society. The segregation of our metropolitan areas today  has lead to stagnant inequality, because families are much less able to be upwardly mobile when they’re living in segregated neighborhoods where opportunity is absent. If we want greater equality in this society, if we want a lowering of the hostility between police and young African-American men, we need to take steps to desegregate these neighborhoods, but this process correction will take decades to right these wrongs committed by government and private industry.   

Decreased African-American Home Ownership

In 2017 African-American home ownership has dipped to its lowest level since the signing of fair housing legislation was passed in 1968 during the Civil Rights era. African-American incomes on average are about 60 percent of average white incomes. But African-American wealth is about 5 percent of white wealth. Most middle-class families in this country gain their wealth from the equity they have in their homes. So this enormous difference between a 60 percent income ratio and a 5 percent wealth ratio is almost entirely attributable to federal housing policy implemented through the 20th century.

Decades of  Disintegration

African-American families that were prohibited from buying homes in the suburbs in the 1940s and ’50s and even into the 1960s, by the Federal Housing Administration, and gained none of the equity appreciation that whites gained by discriminatory  policies implemented by both local, state, and federal government and the financial services industries that continue to rake in record profits as the President brags about the astronomical rise of the stock market. The capital appreciation of these government subsidized suburban single family developments created massive amounts of wealth that allowed low-income and middle class whites to provide down payments for their children’s first home, pay for college, and help them gain access to the startup capital for the creation of businesses.  

Takeaway

To correct the massive negative social and economic impact of Redlining on the African-American community local, state, and the federal government and the financial services industry should create an impact investment fund that would run capital parallel to real estate crowd investment platforms that invest residential and commercial real estate developments in inner-city communities. This is not a request for a grant or a handout, but the creation of an impact investment fund that rights the decades of Redlining and it resulting social and economic chain reaction that has led to poor education, unemployment, food and retail deserts, mass incineration and many of the ills that specifically impact African-American communities today.    

The JOBS Act and Underserved Communities

Introduction

Following the housing crash of 2007 — as regulations were introduced and credit tightened — emerging companies were left with little or no access to the capital markets. In an effort to alleviate the credit crunch, Congress drew up the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (JOBS Act for short), broadening the scope of who can invest in startups. While the legislation was conceived with startup businesses in mind, interested parties quickly realized that the new rules could extend to real estate equity investments, allowing real estate companies to essentially market shares of projects to individual investors — a method of raising capital that had been legally precluded since the Securities Act of 1933.

Real Estate’s Use of Crowdfunding

Real estate companies are able to broaden the reach of their investor network through this new paradigm, individual investors also gain access to a realm of real estate projects that were previously available almost exclusively to very wealthy individuals and institutional players, lowering the barrier to entry and allowing many investors to participate in commercial real estate investing for the first time.  This value was evident enough to encourage the creation of Buy The Block a f hybrid real estate/tech company to enter this new and vastly untapped wealth and community building space for inner-city communities that have been systematically excluded from investing in commercial or residential real estate projects as a syndicate.

Buy The Block

Providing a platform that allows multiple investors to in multiple project throughout the country both in business creation and real estate development. This new investment technique will provide the needed access to capital for budding social entrepreneurs and experienced small business owners to provide many of the needed services that many of these under served communities have been starved of for many years and it develops these businesses in close proximity to the people that require the products and services. These new business owners now have the ability to raise capital directly from the people that will become the consumers of their goods and services. These consumers will have the unique ability to become a funder as well as investors in these community based retail projects. This is a very important concept in the “Buy Black” movements that have sprung up in many of the major markets that have large Black populations.

Financial Incentive

Today these “Buy Black” mantras don’t ring hollow in the ears of consumers looking for the best value for their dollars. By becoming the actual investors in these projects they now how financial interest in in Buying Black. The more profit these business do the higher their potential benefit will be. There is also a double bottom-line and a large part of the return on investment will be community equity of an improved shopping experience in their own communities, the growth in employment opportunities for community residents.

Please visit the Buy The Block website to sign up for this historical opportunity to be become a BlockVestor or Block Developer and own your piece of your community @ http://bit.ly/2zbAmzv  

The Power of Home Ownership

Introduction

A decade after the housing crash destroyed the American Dream for millions of homeowners, black homeownership rates have dropped to levels not seen since the 1960s, hobbling African-Americans’ efforts to build their wealth Nationally, only 42.2 percent of blacks owned homes in 2016, compared with 71.9 percent of whites, according to a new report by Harvard University‘s Joint Center for Housing Studies.

The Power of Home Ownership

Home ownership is a way for people to generate stability and wealth and not just go to work everyday work and make someone else wealthy by renting.  Home ownership can change the trajectory and direction of neighborhoods. As the individual wealth of community members increases the pride and community equity will increase.   Without homes, blacks lack a powerful source of wealth creation. Homeowners generally build equity that allows them to eventually buy other homes or businesses and send children to college. Homes also are passed to younger generations upon death, allowing future generations to build wealth.

The Black Community is Losing Ground

After decades of making gains, the most recent nationwide African-American home ownership rate was the lowest it’s been since the Fair Housing Act of 1968 began tackling discriminatory housing practices. Historically, home ownership has been 28.4 percent higher among whites than blacks, but the racial gap in home ownership is now the largest since data became available in 1940. Prospects for black home ownership have gone from hopeful to pessimistic in only 15 years. Harvard researchers attribute much of the plunge in African-American home ownership to predatory lending practices that saddled buyers in poor minority neighborhoods with more debt than they could afford.

The Great Recession and The Black Community

As a result of “The Great Recession” and predatory lending practices that targeted Black and Hispanic communities these inner-city communities were hit especially hard by the housing crash and the foreclosures that ensued. The disproportionate foreclosure rates in Black communities resulted in increased credit scores damage by foreclosures and the short sales kept people from bargain-hunting in the wake of the housing crash. Prices were low, but even people with good credit struggled to get mortgages as lenders focused on borrowers with great credit. So as home buying has picked up among whites, Asians and Hispanics since the crash, African-American ownership has fallen, according to the Harvard research.

Rent Is Slavery

High rents also are keeping some from home ownership. As demand for rental housing has climbed, rents have surged the last few years, making it hard for many to pool enough funds for a down payment. Rent is slavery that prevents us as a community from building wealth and results in wealth building for someone else. Renting has moved our community to a place where a large number of our community members are paying more than 30 percent of their income for rent, which results in a deficiency in other area of our lives.These high rents keeps on the treadmill that will never allow us to build wealth for ourselves and our future generations.  

Takeaway

When empty foreclosed properties are fixed up and inhabited again, the values of surrounding homes rise. Without the rehab projects, the abandoned properties can “become nuisances in the community that bring unintended consequences,” such as crime, reduced home prices, and low levels of community equity. Buy The Block has create a crowd investment platform that allows us to pool our money together and buy, rehab, and sell properties as a community. The power of the Buy the Block program is that as a community we are able to increase home ownership, create employment for contractors and their workforce, and provide renovated housing stock in our community while allowing members of the community invest and build wealth.

Please visit the Buy The Block website to sign up for this historical opportunity to be become a BlockVestor or Block Developer and own your piece of your community @ http://bit.ly/2zbAmzv    

Understanding Wealth and Income

Introduction

Income inequality has been accelerating, which suggests that the wealthiest, typically meaning Whites, are getting wealthier. According to a new study, the imbalance will shift so far that median Black and Latino households will lose the little relative wealth they have by about the time people of color form a majority of households in the U.S. By 2053, Black households will have a median wealth of zero. It will take Latino households another 20 years to drop to the same level, according to an analysis by non-profits Prosperity Now and the Institute for Policy Studies.

Wealth and Why Is It Important

Even black and Latino families who’ve achieved the traditional middle class status  a good-paying job and a college degree still lag far behind their white counterparts in terms of wealth. Black and Latino families with a member holding a four-year degree own just a fifth of the wealth of equivalent white families. In fact, they own less wealth than a white family whose head has just a high school diploma.

We typically describe middle class status in terms of income. But, if we change the definition to wealth, meaning you’d need between $68,000 and $204,000 in household wealth than middle class White households have nearly 8 times as much wealth as median Black households and 10 times as much as Latino households. Black and Latino families now have to earn two to three times as much as White families to catch up.

If we look at life as a 100 meter dash, wealth becomes the head start in a race, like putting someone on the starting line at the 100 meter mark and another, on the 10 meter mark in a 100-meter dash. By talking almost about income inequality, we essentially pretend that a problem made over decades can be addressed on a single year’s scale. It can’t mathematically work.

On the Road to Zero Wealth

According to the  report The Road to Zero Wealth The divide between the wealth of a typical black family and a typical white family today is vast. A median black family has just $1,700 in wealth—total assets minus total debt. Thirty years ago, that same family had $6,800 in today’s dollars. Latino families at the median have similarly small assets, just $2,000, and also saw a decline over the past three decades. White median household wealth, meanwhile, is significantly higher: $116,800, up from $102,000 over the same period.

So black and Latino families at the middle have seen their wealth slip while white families in the middle saw their wealth rise. What does this look like projected into the future? By 2053, just 10 years after the country is projected to become majority non-white, black median families will own zero wealth if current trends continue. Twenty years later, Latino median families will follow suit. White median families will continue to own six figures.

Takeaway

Changing our priorities in the savings and investment arena such as investments in bold new programs that focus on using social entrepreneurship to solve Black issues, by creating Black owned businesses and jobs, increasing home ownership, and using crowd investment strategies to increase community and personal wealth.  These tactics could reverse the decades-long rise in the racial wealth divide.

Buy The Block allows investors make debt or equity investments in opportunities that were historically difficult to access. Thanks to the Regulation Crowdfunding rules promulgated by the SEC under the JOBs Act, Buy the Block can create a community revolving around its web-based investment platform geared towards making investing in real estate easier for more investors. It presents an opportunity to invest with other connected investors, and provides the added benefit of giving each investor individual ownership in the “block.”

Please visit the Buy The Block website to sign up for this historical opportunity to be become a BlockVestor or Block Developer and own your piece of your community @ http://bit.ly/2zbAmzv

The Crisis in Black Home Ownership

Introduction

The national home ownership rate fell to 63.4% in 2016—the lowest yearly average in 50 years, according to the business data firm CoreLogic. And there may not be a rebound anytime soon. But the largest factor holding down the home ownership rate could be racial inequality. The rate among white Americans is more than 30 percentage points higher than among black Americans, according to Trulia, a real estate site. One recent study found that 72% of all household growth from 2015 to 2025 will be from groups other than non-Hispanic whites. So if these groups face hurdles to buying homes, it could harm the overall growth of the market.

Historic Housing Policy

For decades institutional racism has harmed minority borrowers ability to own an affordable home. An analysis by the The Wall Street Journal found that only 5% of mortgages were offered to African Americans in 2014, down three percentage points from seven years earlier. Hispanics were offered 9% of mortgages in 2014, down two points compared to 2007. Meanwhile white Americans saw their percentage rise by five points during that span.

The legacy of discriminatory housing laws, like the National Housing Act of 1934, which “redlined” predominantly black neighborhoods and shut out minorities from bank loans, continues to have lasting damage as well. African Americans and Latinos suffer from residential segregation, resulting in less value for their homes. If there were no racial disparity in homeownership rates, the overall gap in wealth between black and white American households would decline by nearly a third, according to a recent study from left-leaning public policy group Demos.

Black Home ownership Gains Erased

The Black community got hit harder by the housing crisis than other groups. In general, African Americans bought homes at the peak of the bubble at higher rates than whites and were often offered costly subprime loans, even when they qualified for prime loans with lower interest rates. Also, black families did not benefit as much as white families, overall, from the post 9/11 recovery.

According to Nextavenue homeownership has historically been the best way to build wealth by far. The average wealth of homeowners versus renters. The average wealth for black Americans who are homeowners is $90,000, with $50,000 of that in home equity. The average wealth for black Americans who are renters is $2,000.”

Future Impact

Home ownership declines have affected African Americans of all ages, but among the most alarming are the trends for African American Gen X’ers and Millennials, according to the Urban Institute. The home ownership rate for blacks aged 35 to 44 fell from 45% in 1990 to 33% in 2015, half the rate of whites in the same age group. If  these trends continue, people born from 1965 to 1975 [now age 42 to 52] will likely to be the first generation from the 20th century that reaches retirement age with more renters than homeowners.

Takeaway

Action must be taken quickly in the private real estate  market to reverse these trends or our community will find itself in deeply immersed in a form of economic serfdom. Home ownership builds wealth and wealth is a cushion against economic instability. But the problem is deep-rooted and there is no easy solution.

Buy The Block allows investors make debt or equity investments in opportunities that were historically difficult to access. Thanks to the Regulation Crowdfunding rules promulgated by the SEC under the JOBs Act, Buy the Block can create a community revolving around its web-based investment platform geared towards making investing in real estate easier for more investors. It presents an opportunity to invest with other connected investors, and provides the added benefit of giving each investor individual ownership in the “block.”

Please visit the Buy The Block website to sign up for this historical opportunity to be become a BlockVestor or Block Developer and own your piece of your community @ http://bit.ly/2zbAmzv

Locavesting For Urban Community Development

A revolution in early stage finance is changing the way inner-city African-American communities relate to capital formation, real estate development, entrepreneurship, and job creation. Thanks to the passage of the JOBS Act of 2012, a new market is being born that will revolutionize how early stage investing and community economic development works — It’s called Crowd Investing.

Bill Huston

To this end, I personally believe that equity crowdfunding is the most significant piece of financial based legislation for African Americans since the Emancipation Proclamation 1863 emancipation of the Southern slaves.

Rodney Sampson

“If African-Americans shifted just 1% of the $1.3 trillion they have in purchasing power to small Black-owned businesses and real estate development it would amount to $10 billion invested in Black Communities.  

 

That’s not a game-changer. That’s a revolution!

 

Shifting Dollars  from Consumerism to Local Crowdinvesting

May 16th 2016 the  SEC Rulings on crowdfunding intermediaries went into effect and today ordinary Americans are able to collaborate en masses to give small individual amounts of funding to startups, small businesses, and real estate developments online through crowd investing, and become shareholders in the process.

The Power of CrowdInvesting

When people understand the power of local crowd investing and begin to pull from their bank savings, mutual fund accounts and begin investing 1 percent of their disposable income  in order to put their money to work in their own communities. Crowdinvesting will have the power to change how African-Americans from all income levels make decisions about where to put their money and how to spend that money.

Buy The Block

Crowdinvesting isn’t a new way of investing, but as we transform the way we see ourselves as participants and investors in companies as well as customers there will be a paradigm shift.  Crowdinvesting will make investors into local companies a shareholder and brad advocate leading to the the birth of a new locally driven capital market that brings new access to capital for inner-city community entrepreneurs. To help shape and guide this new investment market, crowdinvesting platforms like Buy The Block  are working hard to help ordinary African-Americans understand the power they wield as crowd investors and how they can participate in this social and financial revolution.

From Consumer to Investor

Crowdinvesting will usher in a radical transformation forever redefining what it means to African-Americans to be a crowd investor in America by bringing local crowdinvesting into the homes of inner-city community members in the Internet Age. If African-Americans embrace the power of crowdinvesting then the most socially transformative part of crowdfunding will come from the power of local or community-based investing.

The Case for Local Businesses

There is overwhelming amounts of recent research from prominent economists, sociologists, and other researchers that find that small, local businesses are critical to overcoming many of our biggest challenges, from reducing economic inequality to building resilient communities. According to the Kauffman Foundation new businesses account for nearly all net new job creation and almost 20 percent of gross job creation.  

Takeaway

According to Local Investing fostering an economy of small-scale businesses may be one of the most effective ways to close the gap between rich and poor. Civic leaders are increasingly grappling with income inequality, and creating policies to foster an economy that’s based on local ownership and community-scaled businesses may be one of the most effective ways to do it. That’s the implication of new research that identifies links between corporate consolidation and the widening gap between the rich and poor.

Black Female Serial Entrepreneur Tackles Commercial Real Estate

Introduction

Linda P. Smith is a serial entrepreneur that founded my first company at 28, with the help of family and friends. In 2010, she established BBE to pay it forward by providing education and funding for businesses. With Buy the Block, she has created the first Black-owned real estate crowdinvesting platform enabling the Black community to pool their immense $1.3 Trillion in purchasing power to come together to make real estate and business development investments.  

What is Crowdinvesting

Traditional real estate investments require a significant financial commitment. Buy the Block is reducing the barriers to entry to as low as $100 which opens direct real estate investment to the vast majority of people in the Black Community. Crowdinvesting became a reality when then President Obama signed the bipartisan JOBS Act of 2012, and May 16th, 2016 Title III of the JOBS Act became legal and opened up direct real estate investment to all Americans. This opened the floodgates to hundreds of millions of new investors.   

Buy The Block

Serial Entrepreneur Lynn P founded Buy the Block in a tool shed in Cincinnati in 2013. The company allowed her to couple her two passions, real estate investing and teaching others the art and science of real estate investment,  into a seamless online crowdinvesting experience for the Black community. Buy the Block has solved two of the major issues of the Black community. The first is access to capital for businesses and real estate development and the second is an investment platform with a low barrier to entry to facilitate the building of community equity and Black wealth at the same time. Buy The Block now serves investors and developers all over the US, and is thrilled to be a part of the global crowdinvesting and alternative finance industry.By bringing investors together with entrepreneurs, we are not just building stronger communities; we are building wealthier communities. In that wealth lies the only real independence.

The Commercial Real Estate Development Industry

Buy the Block’s latest foray into the commercial real estate industry that lacks diversity in the C-Suite. According to a report from the Commercial Real Estate Development Association, a national organization founded almost 50 years ago and that has more than 18,000 members, used Equal Employment Opportunity Commission data and found that more than three-quarters of senior commercial real estate executive positions nationwide were held by white men. Hispanic, Asian, black and other women — hold less than 1 percent of the CRE senior executive jobs nationwide, according to the report. Buy the Block building on its success in the residential real estate development has made its first incursion into this, White male dominated field of commercial real estate development, by leading investors in  purchasing a 24,500 square foot retail structure with tremendous potential for neighborhood retail, office space, and residential space in the downtown area of a major Midwestern city.  

Join The Movement

Buy The Block can manage any project from concept to end, and they aim to develop a large number of construction projects, in areas such as; residential, manufacturing, retail, multi-family, medical, religious, and pre-engineered building construction.

Takeaway

With the focus on the Black communities in America, Buy The Block is on track to raise hundreds of millions of dollars in funding for development projects in these communities. Having the capacity to take on more significant projects and contracts, they project that they will soon change the face of crowdinvesting real estate investing in the country. Join the movement by investing with your peers on the Buy The Block crowdinvesting platform that is breaking ground and barriers in the residential and commercial real estate industry. Visit BuyTheBlock.com and make your investment first investment today with your peers and Buy the Block.   

The Benefits of Crowdinvesting

Raise capital from your customers, so now your customers are owners!

Crowdinvesting is a way to connect with the people. It provides a platform predicated on neighborhood and community among residents, business owners and real estate developers. By allowing customers and community residents to invest in a companies and developments focused on bettering their lived experiences, entrepreneurs and real estate developers are providing opportunity for residents to literally take ownership of their futures. This is a win-win situation and an immense benefit of crowdinvesting.  

Crowdinvesting provides a new opportunity!

Professors, politicians, and community activist have touted the value of black people taking  all the money we spend on clothes, shoes, and hair, and put it into investing or starting a business. Well, it would be impossible to take all of our money and invest it businesses or real estate, but we can set aside a portion of our dollars to invest in the people that desire to start a business or develop real estate and that have the required temperament and skills to be an entrepreneur or real estate developer and invest in them. Crowdinvesting provides investment opportunities that have never in our history in America existed!  

Crowdinvesting is the answer to raising capital and marketing your business!

The U.S. rate of entrepreneurship has declined over the past 30 years, entrepreneurial activity in the African American community has increased. The problem is access to capital. Black entrepreneurs start businesses, but—often—do not have access to the capital necessary to market and grow those businesses over time. Data from the 2015 Survey of Business Owners shows that the number of businesses majority-owned by Black women grew 67 percent between 2007 and 2012, compared to 27 percent for all women and 13 percent for White women. Nielsen quantifies that growth at 1.5 million Black woman majority-owned businesses as of 2015. Crowdinvesting provides a platform for these black women to share the risk and reward of entrepreneurship with their community as investors and consumers.

Crowdinvesting Empowers the Black Community

Crowdinvesting has the potential to  unleashing $1.3 trillion in black buying power to fund black businesses and real-estate projects and it is one of the greatest wealth building opportunities ever made available to the African American community. But none of this will come to fruition without us taking action on the opportunities that crowdinvesting have brought to the table in our community.

African Americans have historically been frozen out of wealth building opportunities necessary to build generational wealth. Usually, when wealth building opportunities have been made available, it was only after other communities had access. This makes crowdinvesting singularly unique in African American history. Crowdinvesting allows black investors and entrepreneurs to have access from the beginning and can share in the economic gains made by startups growing and hiring. Black consumers—trendsetters—can use their dollars and influential platform to select which products, services, and solutions get funded from the beginning.

Takeaway

Crowdinvesting is a great opportunity to both support local business and build livable communities. It provides an opportunity for small businesses, the ones that have the hardest time finding funding, to get investments from those likely to patronize them: local residents. It puts business owners in a place to create a different narrative about their business and who they serve, while allowing them to focus their marketing and fundraising effort in a concentrated area, saving time and money.

Goldman Sachs estimates that crowdinvesting has the potential to be a $1.2 trillion industry. For diverse founders, crowdinvesting can be a game changer for companies and real estate developers seeking investment. It’s a wealth-building opportunity for investors previously restricted from investing in startups.

 

Join the Movement!

Alternative Finance for Underserved Communities of Color

Introduction

We are acutely aware that most small businesses and startups struggle to get access to capital and underserved communities of color receive extremely small amounts of funding from traditional funding sources. So, instead of protesting and complaining maybe small businesses and small real estate developer should begin to implement different methods of finding and deploying capital. We are going talk about 6 different types of investing alternatives that are on the cutting edge of new capital formation for underserved communities of color.

Local Investment Clubs

A traditional investment club is a small group of individual investors who come together to learn, share investing experiences and help each other become more successful investors. Clubs provide education, camaraderie and buying power, plus the confidence of knowing you don’t have to go it alone. Clubs can also choose not to pool investment dollars and instead simply come together to discuss stock ideas and analysis.

Local investment clubs will have a focus on investing in local businesses and real estate development in underserved communities using crowdinvesting to allow the club members the ultimate reward derived from  local crowdinvesting to be owner, customer and brand advocate all at the same time. Again this away to build wealth in underserved communities.

Impact Investing From Corporate and Philanthropic Foundations

“Philanthropy is commendable,” said Martin Luther King, “but it must not cause the philanthropist to overlook the circumstances of economic injustice, which make philanthropy necessary.” Philanthropists and philanthropic advisors who champion equality must work to shift from a framework that grounds giving in “charity” to one that grounds giving in “justice.”                  

Dr. Dorian Burton

As mentioned in the above section making local place based investments makes a lot of sense for investors because the benefits that locavesting bring to both the investor and the community where they live. So let’s take the next logical step and examine why more philanthropic and corporate foundations don’t look to the local market to make impact investments along with the tiny percentage of their endowment that they make grants.

So many of the problems and issues that plague inner-city communities are poverty based and many of them stem from government policies such as redlining. If foundations change their relationships in these communities from charity and began the process of providing location based impact investment into these communities to fund local businesses, real estate development, and wealth building initiatives based on market principles a lot of the poverty based issues would be eliminated.  

Rewards Crowdfunding

Crowdfunding is a new and evolving fundraising alternative that connects social media with an accounting and finance mechanism to aggregate capital on a single platform. Crowdfunding provides a platform for entrepreneurs reach out to the “crowd”—which could include their friends, customers, neighbors, supporters and social network—for funding. The idea is that lots of smaller sums of money can take the place of one or two large investors or patrons, and that technology can help streamline the process.

Crowdinvesting

Crowdinvesting is the truly revolutionary centerpiece of the JOBS Act. It became legal on May 16th 2016. Crowdinvesting provides a platform for   small real estate developers and small companies to raise money from the general public—wealthy, not wealthy, friend or stranger—as long as the investment takes place on a web site operated by a traditional broker-dealer or an S.E.C.-sanctioned crowdfunding portal, and certain other requirements are met.

Specifically, the law allows companies to raise up to $1 million in a 12-month period from the public. Investors are capped at the greater of $2,000 or 5% of their income, if their annual income or net worth is less than $100,000. The final rules also impose a limit on how much those with an income or net worth greater than $100,000 can make: they are limited to $10,000 per year or 10% of their income or net worth.

Takeaway

There are many new and emerging forms of alternative finance that provides the democratization of capital in under capitalized communities of color. Many of the communities find themselves to be isolated in urban centers and are areas of concentrated poverty. These area of concentrated poverty tend to be places that lack hope and many residents become trapped in the despair and hopelessness of the environment. But just like policy created these communities policy and the commitment of investors that want to see their communities changed are able to use their dollars to vote!

Regulation CF and Small Business Finance

Small Business Drives Economic Growth

Despite being the strongest drivers of growth in the U.S. economy, small businesses face immense challenges garnering funding from traditional sources like venture capital firms, angel investor groups, or debt financing. 90 percent of small business owners still believe that banks are the first stop for business financing, despite more than a 30-year history of banks decreasing the number of their loans going to small businesses. Since small businesses aren’t the only ones struggling for financing – startups, entertainment projects, musicians, and others face similar challenges – the new (and popular) crowdfunding industry has increasingly filled the funding gap. 

Traditional Lenders Overlook Small Business

New business owners usually aren’t the best candidates for traditional small-business loans from banks or other funding sources, which typically require collateral, years of successful operation and excellent personal credit. Even if funding were approved, new entrepreneurs may not have the resources to begin making loan payments immediately. Rewards-based crowdfunding is an alternative to traditional small-business financing and provides the means to transform promising ideas into a profitable reality — without having to pay back a penny.

The Crowdfunding Model Works Well For Small Business

Small businesses that have a loyal customer base or large following can investigate the newly passed Regulation Crowdfunding. This new form of equity crowdfunding — which is the result of the new Title III of the JOBS Act — allows companies to raise up to $1,000,000 each year, from investors for their businesses, using crowdfunding platforms. You agree to sell stock in your business and can offer those shares to anyone. However, there are limits on what individuals can invest based on their income. The transactions are done through Web-based platforms — which will both help keep you compliant with all of the laws and rules and will also take a commission on the sale of the stock.

Regulation CF is Perfect for Small Businesses

This form of capital raising is especially attractive to “main street” businesses — which may have a great history and engaged customers, but find that banks aren’t willing, or able to lend to them. This model exists in many other countries, and we see local food-based businesses, bars and pubs, art and creative studios and other product based companies taking advantage of these models and raising on average about $700,000.

Crowdfunding Can Be A Catalytic Funding Event

Crowdinvesting can supply needed capital for equipment, growth capital or for strategic hires. In many cases, it becomes the on-ramp to other more traditional models of financing as a catalytic event. Some savvy small business owners have learned to leverage small early-stage investments through crowdinvesting to increase their bargaining power and get more money from venture capitalists or others later. Whether a tool to provide small funds to launch a startup or as an alternative to the high costs of IPOs, these new rules expand the financing options available to startups and small businesses across the USA.

Locavesting, Crowdinvesting, and Recycling Community Dollars

What is Locavesting

Locavesting is a term that I came across in my work as a crowd investing consultant. I will state for the record that my interest in crowdinvesting lean much more toward local real estate development and local business development than towards the tech startups. I believe that underserved communities must consolidate and recycle their wealth through real estate development and local business development that provides job creation and wealth generation in their community first. According to a Locavestor blog post written by Amy  “Small businesses—which by definition are locally owned—create two out of every three jobs in the U.S., employ half the private workforce and generate half of private GDP.” “They create local wealth by keeping money circulating locally—that’s called the local multiplier effect.  They provide the foundation for a healthy and diversified local tax base, and contribute to the health and well being of their communities.”

Access to Capital

Access to capital is the number one issue facing many local business no matter the size or type of business, but in communities of color accessing capital through traditional methods is almost impossible. Even when the owners have the education and experience accessing business capital is highly unlikely. Big banks, which dominate the market, approve just 2 out of 10 small business loan requests. The odds are worse for women and minority-owned firms: Just $1 out of every $23 in small business bank loans goes to women-owned businesses, for example, even though they represent 30% of all small firms. In the equity space, less that 1% of all businesses receive venture capital funding—and most of that is invested in just three states.

The Convergence of Locavesting and CrowdInvesting

When we look into the investment portfolios of most individual investors we will find stocks and bonds of large multinational companies that very often send jobs and profits overseas. The new retail investor class that crowdinvesting creates is very cash rich and rarely finds itself being invested in local businesses that as stated above are the economic drivers of communities. How do we change that dynamic? How do we channel more capital to productive use—to the small businesses that create jobs, spur innovation and build strong local economies? Well, crowdinvesting is the vehicle that will be able to transfer this capital to small local businesses and real estate development.

Takeaway

There is latent potential capital that is being only as consumer dollars that are leaving the community within six hours of being earned. The vast majority of that money is not being saved or invested only spent as quickly as it is be earned. One solution is the junction between crowdinvesting and locavesting where community members are willing to invest as little as $100 in local businesses and real estate development. Then be customers and brand advocates for the businesses that you have invested in and have a financial interest in being successful. Crowdinvesting and locavesting provide a platform to increase the viability of community based business enterprises. The successful business owners can organize themselves into the next generation of investors and developers as a local investment group.  

Use Facebook to Create an Email List for your Crowdfunding Campaign

Introduction

Email marketing continues to be a strong method digital marketers use to inform, educate and push information to opt-in recipients. Email subscribers convert at almost 4 times the rate of Facebook followers for crowdfunding campaigns. It is a universally used tool that everyone sits down to check at work or home. Your email marketing will generate the highest return on investment (ROI) when you take the time to build and maintain an engaged subscriber list.  We use MailChimp lists they have built-in tools to enhance the process of list building, maintenance, and reporting as you build your crowdfunding campaign.

Email Marketing

Email serves as one leg of a three-legged marketing tool along with a blog and social media to drive our crowdfunding campaigns. Within this three-pronged strategy, email is the distribution mechanism, while a blog is the content center and social media is the conversation mechanism. When new content is posted on a blog, email can be a method of distributing notice of the new article, while social media offers a conversation mechanism for users to talk about the content. Our email list is the foundational marketing piece. It’s a jewel of great value containing the names and direct contact method of customers and would-be customers that enable us to “get in front of” these people regularly. They have invited us into their lives through their inbox.

The Facebook Advantage

Keep in mind that Facebook ads should not be the entirety of your strategy to grow your email list. Instead, it should be one aspect of a larger crowdfunding marketing and promotion strategy. So maybe you use Facebook ads to get in front of new fans, but you also have an email form on your Facebook page as well as your website where you offer things like free downloadables and early access in exchange for an email address.

The Facebook ads will be targeting people who may have never heard of you before, but are inclined to like your product based on their interests. Having forms on your website will target current fans who already know about you and want to go deeper. Both are necessary for an effective email strategy to enhance and support your crowdfunding campaign.

Facebook Targeting

When targeting Facebook users for an ad campaign, you should aim to reach people who are interested in products similar to yours. To do this, you need to find out what your current fans like about your product.   One easy way to figure this out is by looking at your similar campaign pages on crowdfunding platforms. These similar campaigns should already be in your crowdfunding marketing plan. You could also post a simple message on Facebook asking your fans to comment on your product or even run a poll to increase engagement.

The Value of A/B Testing

When targeting your ads on Facebook, it’s a good idea to have at least 2 ads running at a time, each with a different audience to provide A/B Testing to drill down on a message that will resonate best with the target market.  After each of these ads run for a few days, continue with the one that’s performing best, and replace the one that’s performing worse with a different targeting set. This process is known as A/B testing and can help you make the most of your online ad budget.

Formatting Your Ad

Another thing you want to test with your ad is the format.  With Facebook Lead Ads, you can use images or videos and have a number of choices for a call to action. As mentioned above with targeting, you also want to A/B test your format and call to action. Test multiple combinations of ad formats and value propositions to see what converts best. When using digital marketing always test, measure, tweak and retest.

Takeaway

Email provides 53 percent of backers for crowdfunding campaigns while Facebook fans only provide only 12 percent of backers, so building a segmented email list is of considerably more value to any crowdfunding campaign. Facebook Lead Ads are a great way to segment and reach the target market that you desire to reach. Working these strategies in tandem will produce the results that you are looking for from your crowdfunding campaign.  

The Value of Blogging for Your Crowdfunding Campaign

Introduction

Blogging is a great tool to connect and share information with your crowd on a regular basis. By a regular basis, I mean that they can expect to read a new blog post every Friday at 1:00 pm Eastern Time. Never has it been easier to share your experience and expertise in such a direct and concise manner. Writing a blog is a perfect platform to strengthen the connection between you as a professional and your audience, customers, and colleagues. Besides the obvious benefits for a business such as driving traffic to your website and SEO, there are many reasons why blogging is essential to every crowdfunding campaign during the prelaunch period.

Audience Connection

Blogging provides a great way to connect with your audience and help them to get to know you and what your campaign is about and how your product can impact their lives. This helps to build trust, as you become a source of expertise in your field. Consumers like to be informed, and appreciate any knowledge that can be shared with them in a quick and time effective manner. Blogging is also a great platform to receive feedback and engage in dialogue with your customers and audience, helping both you and your audience grow.

Demonstrating Thought Leadership

The best blogs share expertise that is concise and extremely informative. If you have an expert opinion and product for crowdfunding, a blog is a great way to expose your views to the world. When you consistently create content that’s helpful for your audience, it establishes you as an authority in your field. Once you are seen as an authority clients will come to you for all their needs related to your niche and learn more about your product in the case of a crowdfunding campaign. Your blog is a powerful tool to add value to their lives and build trust between you and your audience for your the future launch of your crowdfunding campaign.

Reaching New Customer for your Campaign

Writing blogs is a great way to reach new customers. Potential customers will stumble upon your blog and get an insight into what you and your crowdfunding campaign are all about, and the value you can provide. A blog can easily be shared through social media, quickly exposing your knowledge to the world. Linking back to your website is an obvious way to get new customers to link back to you potentially opening you up to a new relationship with them.

Takeaway

Blogging is a tool like many others that it is used for marketing, but it is more than that because people can look to you as being knowledgeable about the information that you blog about. The importance of blogging for a crowdfunding campaign cannot be stressed enough in today’s marketplace. Along with the other tools that are available such as Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook, incorporating a blog site that gives your audience information that is useful will help you have your crowdfunding campaign growing in no time.

Thanks to These 56 Black-Owned Companies That Offer Shared Co-Working Office Spaces, You Don’t Need Your Own Office Anymore!

 

All in all, there are at least 56 Black-owned businesses that offer shared co-working office spaces in urban communities around the country. Their goal, according to Motherboard is to “provide more than conference rooms, Wi-Fi, and limitless coffee.” Instead, “they are built to give black entrepreneurs a safe space to find themselves in the work of innovation where they have largely been excluded.”

Real-estate centric coworking spaces are about selling desks first, with building community as a secondary goal. Owners of such services usually target freelance professionals, remote workers, and small to medium enterprises who need a space and seek a community with a collaborative spirit.

Here are just 5 of the many Black-owned ones that exist:

#1 – Black Space NYC: Based in New York City, this a collective of young, Black changemakers, systems thinkers, learners, and lovers. By bridging the gaps between policy, people, and place, their platform allows for the greater understanding, access, and cooperation needed to address inequality and injustice.

#2 – Inclusive Innovation Incubator: Based in Washington, DC, this is the first Black-owned community space focused on inclusion, innovation and incubation. The incubator is committed to creating a collaborative environment where under-resourced members have access to the space and services needed to build or grow a successful business.

#3 – Space Called Tribe: Based in Miami, Florida, this is a Black-owned collaborative shared office/co-working space that also houses an urban innovation lab for under served high growth minority entrepreneurs.

#4 – Vector 90: Based in Los Angeles, California, this is a Black-owned hyper-modern industrial-style space with hot desks, a kitchen, and private conference rooms. They give their members the freedom to build their plans from the ground up.

#5 – The Gathering Spot: Based in Atlanta, Georgia, this Black-owned co-working space serves as a hub of diverse collaboration, connections and experiences uniquely positioned to build the future of what community looks like. Frustrated with an inability to find “space and community”, the two founders came up a concept that would “gather” people from all walks of life under one roof with a unique mix of activities.

For the full list of all the Black-owned co-working office spaces, visit:
www.medium.com/theplug/an-almost-comprehensive-list-of-black-owned-co-working-spaces-70c5d086f9ec

Source: http://blog.blackbusiness.org/2018/08/black-owned-companies-offering-shared-coworking-office-spaces.html#.W3WNOOhKhPY

Posted on August 16, 2018 By Staff With 0 comments

BLACK FEMALE ENTREPRENEUR IS FIGHTING GENTRIFICATION USING CROWD INVESTING AND SHOWING BLACK PEOPLE HOW TO DO THE SAME-ONE BLOCK AT A TIME

Lynn P. President/Founder of Buy The Block

Introduction

When you walk into the stores at a strip mall or the local community commercial corridor to purchase your retail needs, have you ever wondered who owns the building that houses all of those retail establishments? The massive apartment complexes that adorned the inner-city skyline and house so many residents in very compact areas where the economic density is immense and truly illustrates the meaning of urban living. Who owns these massive structures that generate tremendous amounts of revenue by merely being present in the community? JOIN THE MOVEMENT! 

For more information or to pledge go to https://buybacktheblock.com/

Commercial Real Estate

The Commercial real estate industry consist of property that is used solely for business purposes and that are leased out to provide a workspace rather than a living space. Ranging from a single gas station to a huge shopping center, commercial real estate includes retailers of all kinds, office space, hotels, strip malls, restaurants and convenience stores, and the size of the United States commercial real estate market is in dollars is around $6.6 trillion according to worth of commercial real estate in the United States according to Statista.

Commercial Real Estate By The Numbers

  • Retail includes indoor shopping malls, outdoor strip malls, and big-box retailers. It also includes grocery stores and restaurants. Its value is around $2.1 trillion, or 36 percent of the total value of the commercial real estate. It consists of at least 9.5 billion square feet of shopping center space.
  • Hotels include motels, luxury resorts, and business hotels. There are roughly 4.4 million hotel rooms worth $1.92 trillion.
  • Office buildings include everything from Manhattan skyscrapers to your lawyer’s office. There are roughly 4 billion square feet of office space, worth around $1.7 trillion, or 29 percent of the total.
  • Apartment buildings are also part of the commercial real estate. That’s because companies own them only to turn a profit. There are around 33 million square feet of apartment rental space, worth about $1.44 trillion.
  • Industrial property is used to manufacture, distribute or warehouse a product. It’s not always considered commercial, especially in land use plans and in zoning. There are 13 billion square feet of industrial property worth around $240 billion.

Commercial Real Estate is White Males Dominate

According to a report from the Commercial Real Estate Development Association, a national organization founded almost 50 years ago, and that has more than 18,000 members, used Equal Employment Opportunity Commission data and found that more than three-quarters of senior commercial real estate executive positions nationwide were held by white men. Hispanic, Asian, black and other women — own less than 1 percent of the CRE senior executive jobs nationwide, according to the report. During more in-depth research I came across this 2014 article by Duke Long 10 Reasons You Will Never Become a Commercial Real Estate Broker, and two of his reasons that stood out to me was point number 4 You are not a (White) man.  This article stands in stark contrast to the reality of Buy The Block!

Who Is Lynn P

Lynn is a serial entrepreneur that founded my first company at 28, with the help of family and friends. In 2010, she established BBE to pay it forward by providing education and funding for businesses. With Buy the Block, she has created the first Black-owned real estate crowd investing platform enabling the Black community to pool immense $1.3 Trillion in purchasing power to come together to make real estate and business development investments.  

Buy The Block

Serial Entrepreneur Lynn P founded Buy the Block in a toolshed in Cincinnati in 2013. The company allowed her to couple her two passions, real estate investing and teaching others the art and science of real estate investment,  into a seamless online crowd investing experience for the Black community. Buy the Block has solved two of the major issues of the Black community.

The first is access to capital for businesses and real estate development and the second is an investment platform with a low barrier to entry to facilitate the building of community equity and Black wealth at the same time. Buy The Block now serves investors and developers all over the US and is thrilled to be a part of the global crowd investing and alternative finance industry.By bringing investors together with entrepreneurs, we are not just building stronger communities; we are building wealthier districts. In that wealth lies the only real independence.

Buy The Block’s First Commercial Development

Lynn P is spearheading her next foray into the commercial real estate with a MAJOR move with Buy Back The Block movement, which will consist of over 1000 individuals raising over $1 million to Buy The Block. As a result, the facility will become 100% owned by the community members who support it. Construction will begin in April 2018, with a $600 thousand renovation that includes 11 retail spaces, office space and apartments. The development plans to reopen in June 2019 as a retail building for the Dayton, Oh community. 

Commercial Real Estate Development Project

Buy Back The Block and Stop Gentrification

The vision we all share at Buy Back The Block is to change investing from confusing and frustrating, to an accessible and enjoyable social experience. This is not what is currently obtainable, and as such we want to create a new generation of connected investors who feel informed, empowered, and confident.

We believe the current options aren’t meeting the expectations of the next generation. We are developing an accessible, collaborative, friendly and fun investing environment for both new and experienced investors. Our efforts provide a seamless and secure solution that empowers people to spend together in a way that has never happened till now.

Conclusion

Before converting this next commercial building project into it to a retail building, the 87-year-old building is sitting empty. Once this door of opportunity opens up, it will allow those of us who are conscious about legacy and generational wealth to say, ‘What are we going to do differently?’ Buying Commercial Properties is next phase in the exciting journey.Your contribution will help us complete the purchase of this property, rehab and host the block party. Also, it will help you buy a piece of your first block! Incredible to hear, but true. Join the Movement to Buy Back the Block at BuyBackTheBlock.  JOIN THE MOVEMENT! 

For more information or to pledge go to https://buybacktheblock.com/.


Posted on December 18, 2017 By Staff With 0 comments

Black-Female Serial Entrepreneur Raises over $110 Thousand Through Crowd Investing To Create The first Black-owned Real Estate Crowd Investing Platform In The United States

The JOBS Act of 2012

Crowd investing is being made possible by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or JOBS Act, a law intended to encourage funding of small businesses and real estate development in the United States by easing many of the country’s securities regulations. It passed with bipartisan support and was signed into law by President Barack Obama on April 5, 2012.  

Crowd Investing for Everyone

On May 16th, 2016 Title III, the regulation crowdfunding act went into effect and the floodgates of capital aggregation have been open to the Black community for the first time in History.  Rodney Sampson, an entrepreneur, educator, and journalist calls “Title III Regulation Crowdfunding the single most important legislation for African-Americans since the Emancipation Proclamation!”

Buy The Block

Crowd investing through Buy The Block allows community members to invest in businesses, residential and commercial real estate with their community peers to build a self-sustained business/investment ecosystem for disenfranchised communities and neighborhoods to build community equity and personal wealth. Buy the Block is the first foray for the Black community into the multibillion-dollar global real estate crowd investing industry as an owner.

Why Crowd Investing

Businesses new and old, small, and large, are now incorporating crowd investing to change the paradigm of urban economic development.  The capital formation playbooks have changed under the weight of the rising tide of “crowd capitalism”. The interest in how to effectively implement crowd investing to is reaching new and dizzying heights every day and Buy the Block is at the forefront of this innovation.

Funding “Black Girl Magic” Through Nail Spas

According to Nielsen Black women have experienced steady growth in income, population, and educational attainment, according to the study. Between 2007 and 2012, Black female entrepreneurs have grown by 67 percent. In education, 64 percent of Black women graduating from high school go straight to college, while 23 percent over the age of 25 have a bachelor’s degree or higher. But On average, black female-led startups raise just $36,000 of outside funding which amounts to 1 percent of VC funding.

Buy The Block intends to transform the relationship between Black female entrepreneurs and access to capital through with their Nail Spa Initiative. Buy The Block is on a mission to fund 12 Black-owned nail spas over the next 12-24 months including the commercial real estate where the spas sit.   

Why does CrowdInvesting matter in this market?

Many inner-city Black communities are retail and food deserts, which means that they lack access to some of the most basic necessities in their communities. These communities have very low Black-owned retail businesses and own even less commercial real estate. Black homeownership is at its lowest level since the 1960’s fair housing laws were enacted, and even though Black start businesses at a high level over 75 percent of them are undercapitalized. The best thing about CrowdInvesting with Buy The Block is that it focuses on solving issues on the inner-city market and allow people to become investors for just $100.  

If you want to find out more about CrowdInvesting or you want to support the 12 Nails Spas initiative, just visit Buy The Block to find all the details and information needed to bring our community project to reality!

JOIN THE MOVEMENT!

Did you join the movement? 

www.buytheblock.com 

Posted on December 13, 2017 By Staff With 0 comments

FIRST BLACK-OWNED REAL ESTATE CROWD INVESTING COMPANY IS SHOWING EVERYONE HOW TO BUY BACK THE BLOCK; BLACK COMMUNITY IS EXCITED

Crowdfund Your Way to the Top!

Little drops of water can run into great pools, and there is power in numbers and these form the premise of crowdinvesting. Recall those charity dinners where lots of money is realized for a good cause because loads of different individuals or organizations contributed their widow’s mite to the coffer? A similar scenario plays out in crowdinvesting. The good part is that the whole process is regulated and backed by laws to protect all the players.

Now, even though crowdinvesting, especially real estate crowdinvesting is a relatively young venture, it has gained many grounds in that short period. Why do you think that is the case? It offers the average person the opportunity to own properties that they would not have been able to hold or sell otherwise. A few years back, you hardly find individuals venturing into real estate, except, of course, the bourgeoisie and the corporate multimillion enterprises. Things have changed since then.

You can make more money, in the long run of course. You get to invest and contribute positively towards the betterment of the lives of numerous people. You would be helping to keep the dream of shelter for ‘all,’ a reality. You would have done something you and your future generation would be proud of for years to come. You can beat your chest in years to come and say ‘yes, I was here,’ in addition to making money.

Although it sounds risky, and it probably is, but come on, what worthy undertaking in life is not fraught with risks? However, as I mentioned previously, the laws and regulators are there to guide and protect you. Besides, BuyTheBlock.com wants to be around in this business for years to come, leading investors like you to greatness.

Own The Block

The real estate investors on BuyTheBlock.com are called BlockVestors, apt right? I love the title myself.

BlockVestors can invest as little as $100 in equity or debt securities. You or anyone else can participate, and you do not need to be accredited.

You pay nothing to register as a BlockVestor. All you need do is register on the website, browse, review any of the available offers, get whatever information you need about the offer with a click, and sign any agreement electronically. Then you purchase your shares whenever it suits you. Social media can be used to publicize the properties you are buying, owning or selling. Very simple right?

Oh, what if you change your mind? There is room for a refund so far as you do that 48 hours before the offer closes. Oh, I almost forgot this tiny piece of information, your returns! This is distributed to all the BlockVestors within the specified period, depending on whether the investment is equity or debt.

Sell The Blocks

You know, there is this freedom associated with Buy The Block kind of crowdinvesting. Another interesting point you should know is that you have the opportunity of becoming a Block Developer at Buy The Block. As such, you can raise $1.07 million for any real estate project and or business that includes real estate over a year period via Buy The Block.

Simple step too, create an online account, provide the property information, followed by some paper works, then after the due diligence protocols and approval you are on your way to becoming a Developer on Buy the Block. Afterwards, you publicize, notify your group of BlockVestors who in turn can invest once the property becomes open for investment.

The whole process is something you can begin once you make up your mind, it does not take much to create your online profile or start block offer.

Offer Categories

Variety is the spice of life. Take a look at the various categories available on Buy The Block.

  • Office category
  • Retail category
  • Industrial category
  • Multi-family residential category and
  • Single-family residential category

No matter your tastes and interests, you are covered. These types, along with the latest offers are beautifully and proudly displayed on BuyTheBlock.com so you can quickly make the right choices.

Why not take that leap of faith? You have nothing to lose really. You can carry out your research on all the other parties involved just to be sure you are at the right place with the proper investment.

Please visit www.buytheblock.com to get all your burning questions answered.

Knowledge is power. Whatever you decide, Buy the Block will work with you every step of the way. If you encounter any problem along the way, they are only a click away. You can also email or call customer care representatives.

Finally, be sure to invest and invest wisely to secure your future and that of many others.

BUY THE BLOCK  A SPACE TO INVEST IN REAL ESTATE WITH YOUR PEERS

Posted on November 22, 2017 By Staff With 0 comments

Program Is Showing the Black Community how to ‘Buy Back the Block’– One Investment at a Time

Lynn the Founder of Buy The Block

Lynn, Founder of Buy The Block — Program Is Showing the Black Community how to ‘Buy Back the Block’s One Investment at a Time

MEMBERS OF THE BLACK COMMUNITY RALLY TOGETHER TO ‘BUY BACK THE BLOCK’– ONE INVESTMENT AT A TIME

Following the successful creation of ‘Buy The Block’ as well as the passionate contribution of the community towards ensuring that the movement’s goal of raising the sum of $100,000+ is reached.  Lynn is thrilled to announce the highly anticipated launch of their new one-stop online crowd investing real estate investment platform,  2017.

Even though we are not yet there, it is heart-warming to see black people across the U.S., unite as one to embrace and support this unique concept via their continued contribution. With their help, we’ve been able to raise almost $109,000+ an amount we are devoting towards the development of our website, app and buying our first block” said Lynn, CEO at ‘Buy The Block’. In the coming months, contributors will be taking advantage of some excellent features that will take everyone by storm. These unique offerings will be targeting the existing state of affairs and bringing a breath of fresh air to the industry.

Suffice it to say that ‘Buy The Block’ aim to lead sponsors and developers in a significant number of investor’s projects if not all. This major factor in their operation distinguishes them from other crowd investing platforms.  While loads of their competitors only handle third-party sponsored projects and front as mediators through the provision of technology to execute funding for outsourcing deal. Buy The Block has been able to carve a niche for itself by putting their money where their mouth is and spearheading their project development with the help of their in-house Block Development Success Managers.

Doing this has helped us to reduce risks to the barest minimum and increase investors’ returns. Furthermore, through the creation of a personalized portal per investor, we furnish each of them with frequent real-time investment updates.  Our process will help us to earn their confidence without hassles.”  With a team of sound and highly respected professionals, Buy The Block is on a mission to change the face of crowd investing real estate. By keeping each investor informed through the provision of regular updates, the company continues to endear itself into the heart of investors.

“We have a blueprint of what works, and it will produce results. We are here to stay and lead the way by making real investing easier than ever” Lynn concluded.  Buy The Block was live on Saturday, June 17th, 2017 (Juneteenth)! Visit our Facebook page for more details.

Buy The Block goal was 500 members, we now have 450+!  Way to go!

Join The Movement

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Contact:
Buy The Block
Email: info@buytheblock.com
URL: https://www.buytheblock.com

Posted on February 23, 2017 By Staff With 73 comments

These Two Black Entrepreneurs Are Fighting Gentrification — One House at a Time!

Andrew Colom and David Alade, founders of Century Partners

What does a real estate developer in Mississippi and a banker in New York City have in common? On the surface, nothing, but inside, both are gentrification fighters, having a burning desire to revitalize neighborhoods in Detroit, one house at a time.

How they got started

Two friends, Andrew Colom, 33, and David Alade, 29, left their jobs and together started a company called Century Partners. Both partners had previously thought deeply about inequities in the world and came to the conclusion that something needed to be done. While Alade initially was turned off about the idea of investing in Detroit revitalization, Colom visited Detroit and saw potential. He convinced his partner to join him.

Now the two black entrepreneurs are working hard to bring Detroit back. Their company buys abandoned homes in Detroit’s historic district and works with other African Americans in the neighborhood to invest in the rehab.

It’s a win/win situation because neighborhoods are getting revitalized which brings back value, and investors make money from their investment through rent paid after the rehab or by selling their homes back to Century Partners for cash.

More than revitalization

The goal of these two motivated entrepreneurs goes beyond gentrification. They want to see vibrant neighborhoods again with increasing values, but they also desire to create diverse neighborhoods. Building wealth in neighborhoods, one house at a time, is their approach.

Alade said they are “looking forward to seeing how it looks on the other side when home values go up and neighborhoods are vibrant again and abandonment is gone.”

For more details about their company, Century Partners, visit www.centurypartners.org

Source: 

Posted on February 1, 2017 By Staff With 0 comments

PROGRAM SHOWS BLACK ENTREPRENEURS HOW TO “BUY THE BLOCK” — MAKING REAL INVESTING EASIER THAN EVER

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Visit buytheblock.org for more information.

Having successfully launched Buy Black Economics (the World’s Largest Digital Info Product Store dedicated to Black Businesses) as well as numerous other ventures, Lynn Da is excited to announce the creation of Buy The Block, an initiative that will allow individuals and groups to pool funds, share knowledge, and vote on properties in which to invest!

As the name suggests, Buy The Block is a web-based platform that is geared towards making investing in real estate easier. It presents an opportunity to invest with other connected investors and provides the added benefit of giving each investor individual ownership in the block.

Buy The Block is currently crowdfunding to take its operations to the next phase, through the development and deployment of a website, mobile app and buying the first block. To join the movement, click here: https://buytheblock.com/

With a good number of black Americans lacking access to viable real estate investment opportunities, Lynn views Buy The Block as the most logical step towards becoming better real estate investors/owners. Once adequately capitalized, the website and mobile app will empower users to start investing, having fun, and building wealth; as a vibrant and interconnected community.

“Buy The Block has been created to help my people invest. Our vision is to change investing from confusing and frustrating, to an accessible and enjoyable social experience,” said Lynn, concept developer for Buy The Block. “We want to create a new generation of connected investors who feel informed, empowered, and confident. The launch of our website and mobile app will certainly take group investing to a whole new level,” Lynn added.

Since 2010, Lynn has created an array of notable projects such as BBNomics.com (a black business crowdfunding site), 2MillionJobs.com (a black business jobs initiative), and Buy Black Economics Investment Group.

Buy The Block is the most recent social marketing concept from of the Cincinnati-based female entrepreneur. With less than a month left to raise $60,000 to $100,000 for the website and mobile app development–Lynn is confident that the community will unite to fully support this effort!

“Ultimately, by making a contribution to this campaign, you are helping Buy The Block reach the goal of creating a platform for our community to acquire and develop real estate” Lynn Da concluded.

For more information or to make a pledge go to https://buytheblock.com/ .

Find Buy The Block on Facebook (facebook.com/buytheblock/), Website ( http://www.buytheblock.com/), Twitter (twitter.com/buytheblocknow) and YouTube (youtube.com/channel/UCCyowx8NEZsiXAZA6u7HeUg), watch the video (https://youtu.be/K6zLbx0pu94)

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PROGRAM SHOWS BLACK ENTREPRENEURS HOW TO “BUY THE BLOCK” — MAKING REAL INVESTING EASIER THAN EVER

Posted on November 4, 2016 By Staff With 63 comments

7 Amazing Black-Owned Businesses in Paris, France

miriam_maxo_black_owned_business_paris

Paris is the capital and the most populous city of France. It is also one of the most romantic cities to visit. It has the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower, museums, fashion and restaurants. It is also home to these 7 amazing black-owned businesses:

#1 – Black SpoonOwned by Fati Niang, this restaurant is the first food truck in Paris to offer African cuisine. Her dishes includes Yassa chicken with lemon served over steamed rice, and Tiep bou Dienn, a grouper filet served with carrots and cabbage.


#2 – Sakina M’sa: this fashion designer of Comorian origin uses recycled materials in her fashion designs. Her creations of high culture ecosystem fashions and dedication to fight the social and economic exclusion of disadvantaged women earned her a Social Entrepreneurs Award in 2010 by the Kering Foundation.
#3 – Nefer by Daniel Tohou: is a high fashion brand for men that offers elegant Paris fashion with an African heritage influence. Daniel’s designed are inspired by the “Harlem Renaissance” as well as by art and music.

#4 – Myriam Maxo: If its home decor you’re looking for, this shop uses African-inspired fabrics with abstract patterns and wax. The designer, Myriam Maxo (pictured above), offers contemporary designed furniture, decorative items and other odds and ends.

#5 – Présence Africaine: looking for a good book? This African quarterly cultural, political, and literary magazine, founded by Seneglese-born Alioune Diop in 1947, was the first imprint to publish most of the best known Francophone African writers of the 20th century. They are now both a publishing house and a bookstore.

#6 – Afrostreamthis movie streaming service only features African and African-American content. It was founded by Tonjé Bakang Tonjehas who is known as “The Netflix of Africa”.

#7 – Alexis Peskine: this artist is a Parisian resident, a 2004 Fulbright Scholar who holds a B.F.A. from Howard University an M.A. and M.F.A. from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA). His work focuses on race and identity issues in France.

Posted on September 18, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

Top 10 Black Business Expos Across the Country — And Minority Business Expos Too!

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Business expos are conventions or trade shows that provide local small businesses an opportunity to showcase their products and services. For many Black and minority-owned businesses, these events are very critical for them to network and find new customers.

Here are the top 10 Black and minority business expos across the country:

#1 – Southern California Black Business Expo: An advertising information and marketing resource that focuses on helping promote and increase the sales of black businesses to black consumers in southern California.

#2 – Indiana Black Expo Business Conference: founded in 1970 to support the accomplishments and achievements of African Americans throughout the state of Indiana. The highlight of the organization is the annual Indiana Black Expo Business Conference.

#3 – Memphis Black Expo Cultural Festival & Black Business Showcase: established in 1999 to provide an annual 5-day cultural celebration where local and national business owners can gather to showcase their products and services to consumers.

#4 – Madison Black Business Expo: supports black-owned businesses, clubs, organizations, and service providers throughout Madison, Wisconsin, by an annual community event that creates space for networking among black business owners.

#5 – Jackson Black Business Expo: provides a working network between the community and black-owned businesses in the Jackson, Mississippi, metro area.

#6 – Lexington Minority Business Expo: established in 2002 to help build business opportunities for black-owned businesses in the Lexington, Kentucky area.

#7 – Virginia Minority Business Expo: an annual trade show for Richmond, Virginia black-owned businesses that provides a central location for minority-owned businesses to showcase their product, services or innovations.

#8 – Boston Minority Business Expo: provides an annual forum for minority business owners to meet and exchange ideas as well as increase their business by networking with customers and other small businesses in the Boston area.

#9 – WRMSDC Minority Business Expo: the largest and longest running minority business expo in Northern California. The annual expo connects suppliers, buyers, and corporate representatives from across the states of California, Nevada, and beyond.

#10 – Triad Minority Business Expo: services minority-owned businesses across Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the Southeast Region of the United States.

BONUS:  New York Black Expo@NYCBlackExpo

Black Expo America presents the 2017 New York Black Expo (place TBA) in 2017. Email info@newyorkblackexpo.com for more info. New York City  newyorkblackexpo.com  Joined November 2011

 

SUBMIT LISTING

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Posted on August 11, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

6 Black-Owned Barbecue Spots That Have Been Around for Over 60 Years

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Barbecue restaurants (also known as BBQ joints, spots, pits) serving dishes like pork rib, cole slaw, potato salad and more have long been popular among African Americans, and there are many Black-owned ones located across the country. Several, however, have been around for quite a few decades and were even frequented by civil rights heroes like Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Here are 6 Black-owned barbecue spots that have been around that long:

#1 – Bar-B-Q Shop: Located in Memphis, Tennessee, this joint is known for its acclaimed sauces & dry seasonings top ribs, spaghetti & pork sandwiches served on Texas toast. Many say that barbecue spaghetti, one of the city’s signature dishes, got its start here.

#2 – Brenda’s Barbeque Pit: Located in Montgomery, Alabama for nearly 75 years, Brenda’s Bar-B-Que Pit is the fourth-oldest barbecue joint in the state. Since opening in 1942, the west side staple has witnessed Montgomery’s changing history, at times seeing it first-hand.

#3 – McMillan Bar-B-Que: This joint in Mobile, Alabama, was established after Hurricane Frederick destroyed the gas lines to the family’s service station in 1979. Now, however, it is run by a second generation of the family. The owners cook toothsome pork ribs over oak wood in a brick-and-plaster pit that the family built themselves.

#4 – Bunyan’s Bar-B-Q: Located in Florence, Alabama, this restaurant is known for what the Washington Post calls its “sensational mustard-based hot slaw”. It’s a cozy, retro-style pit stop for hot dogs, beans & chicken, and renowned foodist Michael Twitty has called their barbecue “edible jazz.”

#5 – Tony Morrow’s Real Pit BBQ: Located in Atlanta, Georgia, this restaurant (pictured above) is known as a brick-walled spot that plays old R&B music. The diner features cowhide-adorned seats, and a delicious menu of BBQ & Southern standards. They are specifically known for their outstanding lemon-pepper ribs and moist red velvet cupcakes.

#6 – Lannie’s Bar-B-Q Spot: Located in Selma, Alabama, this black-owned restaurant is, according to The Washington Post, “a meticulously maintained, high-ceilinged, white-walled neighborhood restaurant” that’s been around for about 75 years. It’s also known for being a local community center.

Source: http://blog.blackbusiness.org/2016/06/black-owned-barbecue-bbq-spots-joints-pits-restaurants.html#.V2qZc9IrJ1s

 

Posted on June 22, 2016 By Staff With 4 comments

Haiti becomes part of the African Union

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Haitian Ambassador to South Africa, Jacques Junior Baril says Haiti finally being part of the African Union (AU) is a place that the country earned as they paved way to other African countries to be free today.

The Caribbean state of Haiti will officially become a member of the AU come the next AU Summit which will take place next month in Lilongwe, Malawi.

Former African Union chairman, Jean Ping said: “We have attachment and links to that country. The first black Republic…that carried high the flame of liberation an freedom for black people and has paid a heavy price for so doing.

In 2012, Haiti indicated its interest to move from its observer status to member status. It will be the first time any nation with no geographic connection to the continent of Africa to join the AU.

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Posted on May 10, 2016 By Staff With 10 comments

Black-Owned or Nah?: Why These Entrepreneurs Don’t Reveal Their Businesses are Black-Owned

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In growing a business, most entrepreneurs adopt key strategies that help them attract and maintain consumers. For Duane Draughon, owner and operator of VizX Design Studios, hiding the fact that his business is Black-owned is the key.

Draughon avoided putting pictures of himself and his family on the company website and introduced himself to potential clients as a project manager, NOT the owner. He even brought on a white insurance representative to carry out job interviews and put together a white sales team.

“I never said I wasn’t the owner,” he told theChicago Tribune. “If asked, I would admit it.”

Draughon is among some business owners who keep hidden the fact that their businesses are Black-owned, for fear of losing clientele. Preconceived notions that the product or service is solely geared toward Blacks — and racial intolerance on the part of potential customers — could drive business into the ground.

“As soon as you say it’s Black-owned, white people will believe it’s only for Black people, and Black people will look for something wrong with it,” said Chicago tech entrepreneur James Parker.

Parker had no intention of revealing himself as a Black business owner either, until now. He even went so far as to keep his picture out of promotions for his discount date site, BestDateNight.com. Some founders use similar tactics, lessening the number of Black images in advertisements or eliminating them altogether.

Alysia Sargent, CEO of Go Dutch Today, said she “doesn’t want her brand to be Black.” She wants African-Americans to utilize her services of course, but also wants to ensure that her marketing is “very broad and multicultural.” She and two other African-American women founded the dating website and app.

“It’s kind of unfortunate, but if we want to go further and appeal to venture capitalists and angel investors, we can’t just be Black,” she added.

But aside from the factor of race, what would draw consumers to invest in Black-owned businesses over white-owned businesses?

Luke Visconti is the founder and CEO of Diversity, Inc. Magazine and attempted to answer this question in his column titled “Ask the White Guy.” In the column, readers pose questions and Visconti answers from the perspective of a white business owner.

“With all things being equal, and with the above circumstances, there are several reasons for a white businessperson to decide to do business with a black-owned business over a white-owned business,” he wrote. “It’s called ‘supplier diversity.’ Supplier diversity is not charity. It is a process by which companies improve their business. Properly implemented, supplier diversity lowers costs and increases margin and/or revenue.”

So, telling the world your business is Black-owned might not be so bad after all.

Source:

Black-Owned or Nah?: Why These Entrepreneurs Don’t Reveal Their Businesses are Black-Owned

Posted on May 2, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

The Presence of Black Businesses in the Community Helps to Reduce Local Crime Rates

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An increase in Black-owned businesses in any local area will result in a decrease of crime, according to Karen Parker, professor of sociology and criminal justice at the University of Delaware.

Parker is also the author of the 2013 study, The African American Entrepreneur – Crime Drop Relationship: Growing African American Business Ownership and Declining Youth Violence, and she says that when we address unemployment, poverty and joblessness in urban areas, we are also addressing the crime rate.

Is she right?

It seems so because according to the finding in her study, since 2001, Black-owned businesses have increased by 60 percent (from 1.1 million businesses to 1.9 million), and the crime rate in those areas that have high volumes of Black businesses has decreased by 29 percent. Why?

Researchers point to three primary reasons for the cause-and-affect discovery.

  • Black-owned business owners serve mentors and positive role models for black youth in particular
  • Black-owned businesses raise morale throughout their communities
  • Black-owned businesses create more local jobs and economic opportunities for African Americans that reverse poverty

Influence is more than economic

Like other business owners, black business owners are very much involved in their communities through business and social organizations, churches and schools. They support the black community by hiring black employees, bringing jobs and infusing more money into their communities.

But it is more than that! Black-owned businesses are a powerful influence to youth and others. They demonstrate that, if they can do it in spite of huge obstacles, others can do it, too. They bring not only economic advantages, but hope.

http://blog.blackbusiness.org/2015/05/black-businesses-community-help-reduce-local-crime-rates.html#.Vx9WWtIrK2w

 

 

Posted on April 26, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

How 1 man single-handedly opened the only grocery store in the 9th Ward

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Burnell Cotlon is talking intently to the soft-spoken woman on the other end of the line.

“Can you hear me, Grandma? What’chu want down there?” he asks. ” Some bread, some ham and cheese?”

The woman requests a jug of Hawaiian Punch.

“I’ll drop it off to you, okay?” he confirmed. “Yes, ma’am.”

It was a quick phone call for Cotlon, but a lifeline for the woman he calls Grandma and the thousands of other residents who live in New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward.

More than 10 years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans and all but destroyed the Lower Ninth, Cotlon has sunk every cent of his life savings into restoring the quiet neighborhood to the family-friendly community he remembers from his childhood.

Visit him here: 

Lower 9th Ward Market 

2036 Caffin Ave

New Orleans, LA
 (504) 319-8855

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Read more: http://www.nola.com/dining/index.ssf/2016/04/burnell_cotlon_9th_ward_grocer.html

Posted on April 9, 2016 By Staff With 1 comment

3 Super Easy Ways To Support Black-Owned Businesses

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Small businesses represent a very important aspect of our entire economy. The same is true about businesses owned by African Americans and other minorities. There are many people in America who really do want to support black businesses, but they may have no idea how to go about it.

Here are three great ways in which we can all lend support to black-owned businesses.

#1 – Look for them: it may take some homework to identify black-owned businesses because they are not as abundant in communities. Maybe you have to drive a little further, but know that by doing this, you are supporting a black-owned business.

#2 – Try something new: this is a great opportunity for consumers to mix it up and try different products and services they may end up liking even more than those they were used to purchasing from mainstream businesses. Nix the stereotyping and respect black products.

#3 – Recommend them to others: whether it’s word of mouth, social media, recommendations to friends, or actually taking the initiative to reach out to a black-owned business, do it. Whenever you have the opportunity, promote a black-owned business.

It’s not enough just to avoid discrimination

Not discriminating is, without saying, absolutely necessary. But taking positive action to reach out and include black-owned businesses in your B2C or B2B plans is an action that will make a difference. You will be not only supporting black-owned businesses but also showing them that black economy matter as well.

 2 Million Jobs Movement!

2MILBLKMENS

Posted on March 27, 2016 By Staff With 6 comments

What is Happening to All the Black-Owned Book Stores? Only About 50 Are Left

Desmond Reid, owner of Dare Books, a once-popular book store in Brooklyn, New York that closed back in 2009 after more than 22 years.

Desmond Reid, owner of Dare Books, a once-popular book store in Brooklyn, New York that closed back in 2009 after more than 22 years.

What is happening to black-owned bookstores? By 2012, 66 percent of black-owned bookstores in America disappeared. Since that time, half of the remaining bookstores have also gone away. Is it something black bookstore owners are doing wrong? Not necessarily, according to The National Endowment for the Arts.

What is happening to black stores everywhere

The fact that black-owned bookstores are closing everywhere is not necessarily a negative reflection on the owners. One of the biggest problems in America right now is that people are not reading as much anymore. The National Endowment for the Arts stated as far back as 2004 that “…literary reading in America is not only declining among all groups, but the rate of decline has accelerated, especially among the young.” If reading is on the decline, bookstores are no longer a viable business.

Other factors

There are, of course, other causes for the close of black bookstores, such as a weak economy, rise in rent costs for bookstore owners, and bad business management. But the largest, most contributing factor appears to be also the most disturbing factor, and that is the lack of interest in reading books. Even web sites that feature books by African Americans and about the African American culture are suffering.

With other sources of information available now through technology, black and white bookstore owners are facing a tough business environment. Some have suggested that, instead of just books, bookstore owners need to be creative to get people in the door by selling other products they would be interested in. Others have speculated that black bookstores have added to their demise by focusing just on the black community and need to expand their products to include books of interest to a wider community.

Friday, March 25, 2016 at 6:00 PM we will take the #2MillionJobs campaign on the road to support a local black owned bookstore. #EachAndEveryFriday #SupportBlackBusiness Help us save black owned book stores!

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Smith & Hannon Bookstore Address: 1531 California Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45237

What do you think?

Read more at www.aalbc.com/blog/index.php/2014/03/31/54-black-owned-bookstores-remain-america/

 

Posted on March 21, 2016 By Staff With 2 comments

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BLACK BUSINESSES

Image of happy young businessman looking at camera at workplace in office

Where are most Black businesses located?
Black-owned businesses accounted for about 28% percent of all businesses in Washington, DC, the highest ratio in the nation. Second, was the state of Georgia, where 20% of businesses were Black-owned, and the state of Maryland, with about 19%.

The state of New York, however, has the most Black-owned firms at 204,093 but this only accounts for 10.6% of the businesses in the state. Second is the state of Georgia, third is the state of Florida, and fourth is the state of Texas with the most Black-owned businesses but not necessarily the highest ratios.

What types of businesses do African Americans own?
Well, it varies, but most offer some type of service, opposed to selling products. For instance, nearly 38% of Black businesses are in health care and social assistance, repair and maintenance, and personal and laundry services. Other categories include advertising firms, auto dealerships, consulting services, restaurants, beauty-care (barbershops/beauty salons), and more.

How many people are employed by Black businesses?
Not very many. Of the 2.5 million Black businesses, only about 107,000 of them have actual employees. Such firms employ more than 920,000 people with a total annual payroll of $23.9 billion. The other 1.9 million businesses do not have paid employees.

Who are some of the top Black-owned businesses?
There are few Black-owned firm that generate billions of dollars in annual revenue, but many that generate millions. For instance, GlobalHue, an advertising agency in Detroit, Michigan, generated more than $480 million in revenue in 2015. RLJ McLarty Landers Automotive Group, a chain of car dealerships throughout the country, generated more than $540 million in 2015. And, World Wide Technology, a global technology consulting firm and the largest Black-owned business in the country, posted revenues of more than $2 billion.

Why are there so few Black businesses?
It’s true that the numbers should be higher. African Americans make up more than 13% of the U.S. population, but only own 7% of the businesses there. The answer to this question will vary depending on whom you ask, but most agree that racism, discrimination and predatory lending are all factors because many aspiring Black business owners have been unfairly turned down by bankswhen applying for small business loans.

Another factor is that there is a lack of economic and business resources in African American communities. This leads to a lack of education on how to properly start and manage a successful business.

Are there resources available to help?
Yes, there are many programs available to assist African Americans and other minorities. Banks like Wells Fargo and Bank of America have special lending programs that make sure that African American business owners are getting the loans they need. Many non-profit organizations give grants and free training via workshops to minorities. In addition, many Black business events (conferences, workshops, etc) offer unique opportunities for African American professionals to network with key decision makers and others who can be of assistance. Finally, there are many magazines that offer weekly or monthly news and advice for Black and minority business owners.

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BLACK BUSINESSES

Posted on March 10, 2016 By Staff With 1 comment

100 BLACK-OWNED BUSINESSES TO SUPPORT 365 DAYS A YEAR

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100 BLACK-OWNED BUSINESSES TO SUPPORT 365 DAYS A YEAR

Jermaine Dupri and Killer Mike kicked off Black History Month by joining Usher and the Influencer Coalition family at Atlanta’s only Black-owned financial institution, Citizens Trust Bank. We decided to create a list of 100 businesses you too can support all year round.

A statement from Usher,  “Empowerment starts with ownership. We’re here supporting Citizens Trust Bank as a Black bank, but it also stands for the support of all the Black businesses that they support. It’s all about supporting our own,” Usher explained.

Let us take it a few steps further, by supporting as many black businesses we can find all year round. Also, remember to join our #2millionjobs campaign by supporting local or online black businesses #eachandeveryfriday. 

Visit or  2millionjobs.com for more details. 

Here is your list of 100 Black-Owned Businesses to support – LET GO! 

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BLACK OWNED BUSINESSES RUN BY CHILDREN 

#1 – Lemonade from Bee Sweet Lemonade – Today, the award-winning BeeSweet Lemonade is buzzing off the shelves of Whole Foods Market, the world’s leader in natural and organic foods, and available at a growing number of restaurants, food trailers and natural food delivery companies.

#2 – Bow ties at Mo’s Bows – Mo’s Bows is a company I started in Memphis, TN in 2011 when I was just 9 years old. I couldn’t find fun and cool bow ties, so one day I decided to use my Granny’s scrap fabric to make and sell my own. I like to wear bow ties because they make me look good and feel good. Designing a colorful bow tie is just part of my vision to make the world a fun and happier place. -Moziah

#3-  Clothing and accessories at Maya’s Ideas – I’m a 15 year old philanthropist, environmental activist, entrepreneur, eco-designer, inspirational speaker, artist, animator, coder, (I make animated short films), illustrator, and writer. I am the CEO of Maya’s Ideas, a company I started in 2008 when I was just 8 years old. I create eco-friendly clothing and accessories. My designs are sold all over the world and I have customers in Denmark, Italy, Australia and more. I love to use my creativity to give back. 10-20% of my profits go to causes local and global charities and environmental organizations.

#4 – Cookies from Mr. Cory’s Cookies – Cory has always had a dream of making the world better for everyone he knows.  That passion, combined with a love of treats and an entrepreneurial spirit, led Mr. Cory to be the owner of Mr. Cory’s Cookies at just 9 years old.  His delectable cookies are all-natural and made from high-quality ingredients – not wacky ingredients with names that you can’t pronounce. In 2009, Mr. Cory told his mother he was tired of taking the bus to school and he wanted to buy his mom a car. He crafted the idea to sell hot cocoa to raise the funds. Mr. Cory put all his spare time into selling hot cocoa at the Roman Inn in Englewood, NJ, and later in front of his home.

#5 – Gourmet popcorn from E & C Popcorn Shop – E & C Popcorn, aka Ethan and Collier Popcorn Company, is an Atlanta based online retailer of homemade “gluten-free”gourmet specialty Caramel popcorn. As a way to reward their two young sons for having a productive day at school and to teach them about business and entrepreneurship, Monique and Ben Evans along with their sons, Ethan and Collier started E & C Popcorn Company, and this families love of popcorn was born

BLACK OWNED RESTAURANTS IN MIAMI- DADE COUNTY

# 6 – Bahamian Connection Restaurant  – Bahamian Connection Restaurant was established in 1978 by Arlington Ingraham better known as Big Links from Tarpun Bay Eluthera and Bain Town, and West Street Nassau Bahamas. Bahamian Connection Restaurant is a family owned business operated by Andy, Philip, Richard and “Mike” Ingraham of Fort Lauderdale Florida
4400 NW 2nd Ave., Miami, FL 33127
Contact: 305-576-6999

#7 – Jamrock Cuisine – Bridging Jamaican eats with Chinese delicacies, this former Jamaican grocery store dishes out the best of both Caribbean and Asian worlds. The bright and casual dining room with homey furnishings and framed island prints is as cozy as the menu is exotic. Jamaican patties with coco bread, curried goat and brown stew fish please islander palates, while Chinese Jamaican dishes include pork with ham choy and chicken dun goo with mushrooms. Patrons who want to treat Chinese Jamaican cuisine as more than just a spectator sport can purchase some of the imported staples and seasonings from the family-owned marketplace.
12618 SW 88th St., Miami, FL 33186
Contact: 305-598-7625

#8- Aunt I’s Jamaican Restaurant – Aunt I’s is not only the name of the restaurant but the nick name of a real person, Inez Grant. The vision was born out of a mother’s exceptional Jamaican country-style cooking ability, a love for people and a heart for service. Inez had a yearning to open a restaurant ever since she moved to Florida from Kingston, Jamaica.
19934 NW 2nd Ave., Miami, FL 33169
Contact: 305-654-9638

#9 – Sheri Restaurant – Sheri African Restaurant is a concept that transports Nigerian home cooking to America. Southern Nigerian cuisine is a combination of traditional foods (gluten, lactose and dessert free diet) and colonial foods (sweet and savory pastries) influences. At Sheri Restaurant they specialize in authentic traditional cuisine. Their food is handcrafted from scratch with fresh and natural ingredients; they do not use artificial ingredients, butter and sugar.

16595 NW 27th Ave., Opa Locka, FL 33054
Contact: 305-622-310

#10 – Chef Creole Seafood & Catering – At Chef Creole, their menu contains an enticing array of seafood, inspired by a mixture of Bahamian/Haitian flavors and has become the standard for fresh seafood the owner “Ken Sejour” has grabbed his native Haitian cuisine by the fishtail and created Haitian seafood for the masses

Caribbean
13105 W Dixie Hwy, North Miami, FL 33161
(305) 893-4246
 
NW 54th St., Miami, FL 33127
Contact: 305-754-2223
 
1392 NW 119th St, Miami, FL 33167
(305) 769-9440200

7957 N.E. 2nd Ave.
Phone: 305.754.2298

20356 NW 2nd Ave (441)
Phone: 305.651.4761

NAIL POLISH

#11 – Adore Her Nails – Former model turned nail lacquer enthusiast, Devorne Love, created this eye-catching and affordable line that also has a fun and flirty appeal.

#12 – Polish and Company – From cosmologist and nail expert, Theresa Williamson, this brand was created for the beauty bombshell with the aesthetics of a Southern belle.

#13 – Underground Nail Queenz (UGNQ) – Created by former army brat, Jacklyn Berry, this new, chic & revolutionary nail polish brand promises to add a shimmering iridescent shade with a special touch.

#14 – Ginger + Liz – Created by Ginger Johnson and Liz Pickett, this line is heavily influenced by arts, travel, entertainment and especially the Classic Chic, Modern Luxe, Bohemian Hipster, and Rock Glam fashion driven lifestyles.

#15 – Bernadette Thompson Nail Care and Color – Created by Bernadette Thompson, a trend-setting nail artist, this line give a seasonal presentation of slick, sophisticated, fun colors that literally put the latest fashion trends on women’s finger tips.

#16 – Lisi Cosmetics – Lisa Hill, a make-up, and nail artist, created this brand that boasts a nail lacquer line with a vast selection of glitter-crazy, and delectable glimmering colors.

BLACK OWNED NAIL SALONS & SPA’S 

#17 – Symmetry MedSpa – D’Livro L. Beauchamp, MD is a Board-Certified Physician of Urgent Care Medicine. Dr. Beauchamp earned a Doctor of Medicine from Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, DC. He performed General Surgery Residency Training at Howard University Hospital in Washington, DC. Dr. Beauchamp has a special interest in aesthetic medicine and anti-aging medicine

#18 – Gigi’s Mind Body & Soul – Gigi’s was founded by Germaine Abraham-Leveen in 2009. Gigi’s strive to bring you the best current treatment methods customized to your specific skin type For the past 4 years, Gigi’s personal mission has been to provide clients with the most professional and relaxing experience. The Day Spa services all your skin care needs from head-to-toe. Gigi’s believe in providing a “personal touch” to each client that give a sense of individuality in resolving their skin care concerns.

#19 – Delord Clinical Skincare – Since the start of her esthetician career, Traci Williams, Ph.D., Integrative Esthetician, Beverly Hills Facialist, has been on the cutting edge of esthetics, as she developed the Alternative Acne Therapy and Medical Esthetician training protocols in 1990. After studying Health Science at a local university she also received her holistic nutrition degree’s through Clayton College of Natural Health.

#20 – Lady Dee’s Day Spa  – We have a unique approach to skincare which delivers the best results in a very short period of time. During your initial visit to our studio, you will be seen by a para-medical esthetician who will provide an in-depth analysis of your skin, addressing your specific concerns. Your skincare program will have two distinct stages. The first is to achieve the desired results, and the second is to maintain those results. 

#21 – AM Salon & Spa – AM Salon and Spa is owned by Toney Canty and Ana Marquez, offering you a diverse group of experienced hair stylists and the ultimate in pampering and renewal. 

#22 – Le Skintique Day Spa and Beauty Salon – Full service salon and day spa for women and men.  Skin care,  body rituals, make-overs, waxing, complete ethnic natural and synthetic hair care, men’s grooming.  Call for an appointment now and receive a free skin analysis and complimentary samples of products. 

#23 – Sanctuary MedSpa – Sanctuary MedSpa services include SmartLipo, Botox and Fillers, Laser Hair Removal, Bio-Identical Hormones, Laser Skin Treatments, Microderm and Peels, Facials, and more. 

# 24 – JoJuDa’s Salon and Day Spa – We offer a wide selection of professional services including styling, cutting, color, weaves / extensions, braids, makeup application, brow shaping, nail care, facials, massage therapy and more. 

#25 – Nailphoria Day Spa – Manicures, Pedicures, Skin Care for Men and Women, Waxing, Eyelash Enhancements, Brow and Lash Tinting, Massage, Herbal Foot Soaks with Massage, Spa Parties, Mobile Services Available for your Special Events. 

# 26 – Violet J Spa & Wellness – Violet Johnson, PhD developed a spa menu to reflect her background as a nurse midwife and psychologist and her skill as an acclaimed esthetics professional. Violet is also a leading expert in the unique issues of multi-ethnic skins, including pigmentation problems, sensitivity and acne. 

#27 – Essenza Medi Spa – Dr. Edythe Woodruff Stewart is the Medical Director for Essenza Medi Spa.  Dr. Stewart attended medical school at the University Alabama-Birmingham.  Always one devoted to the health and well-being of all people, her most recent endeavor is to heal not just the body, but to raise the self-esteem of both men and women in the Central Valley.   She has a full staff of Registered Nurses, licensed Aestheticians, and certified Massage Therapists who are all qualified to help you look and feel your best. 

#28 – 2GORJIS Spa – Kim Evans is a licensed Aesthetician, Makeup Artist, Holistic Massage Therapist, Business Woman, Nutrition Educator, Consultant and owner of  2GORJIS Integrated Health & Wellness, a private facial practice for both women and men for a decade plus.

#29 – Francine’s Salon and Day Spa  – Francine Austin is the proud owner of Francine’s Salon and Day Spa, the first African American Salon & Day Spa in Hartford County, located in Bloomfield, Connecticut for over a decade. She is a 20 year plus veteran of the cosmetology industry were she utilizes her passion to inspire others to embrace their outward appearance, but more importantly their inner beauty.

# 30 – Beautiful Spirit Salon & Spa – Bernadette Johns is a licensed beautician and cosmetologist providing the best hair care using quality products.  Offering natural hair and weaves, braids, scalp treatments, manicures, pedicures, lash extensions and facials. 

#31- Edward’s Wellness & Skin Care  – Thelma Carole Edwards is a Licensed Aesthetician (Skin Care Therapist), Certified Massage Technician (CMT), Reflexologist, and a Nationally Certified Make-Up Artist. Come enjoy the art of wellness in Skin, Body, and Spirit.

#32 – Raquel’s Signature – Racquel has been in the Beauty Industry for more than 20 years. As Master Stylist and Image Consultant her expertise ranges from Cosmetic Hair Extensions, Precision Hair Cutting, Hair Care, Hair Coloring, Relaxers, Hair Texturizing, Alopecia Or Hair Loss reconstruction, Custom Wig Making, Lash Extensions, Makeup, Brow Shaping and more. 

#33 – Flawless Wax & Spa  – We provide the ultimate spa experience while being Downtown Orlando’s premier wax and skin spa. Specializing in waxing, eyelash extensions, semi permanent makeup, and skincare.

#34  – A Visible Difference Beauty Concepts – A Visible Difference is a source of refuge, a place where you can retreat then return to your normal routine anew. The menu of services is specially created with the wilted flower (a tired woman) in mind to help rejuvenate and restore you to a striking beautiful flower. Our technicians are highly trained individuals with over 30 years combined experience. The goal is to have you, the client, leave our establishment feeling refreshed, looking beautiful and anxiously waiting to return.

#35 – Iwi Fresh Garden Day Spa – iwi fresh Garden Day Spa is located in the Castleberry Hill art district in Downtown Atlanta, GA. We offer garden fresh skincare products, made by-hand, and provide one-of-a-kind spa and salon services Tuesday thru Sunday of every week.  

#36  – Too Groovy Salon & Spa – Founded in 2003 by healthy hair care innovator, Robin D. Groover, Too Groovy Salon has transformed the hair of thousands of women from coast to coast. Our Hair Care Specialists use award winning techniques in the arts, sciences and methodology of advanced hair care to achieve optimal results.  Too Groovy Salon has won numerous awards, to include the Bronner Brothers Icon Award and the Steve Harvey Neighborhood Award for best Hair Salon.  Come and experience for yourself why so many women travel for miles to indulge themselves in the most sought after chemical-free system for silky-smooth-straight styles, and textured styling for those seeking definition, elongation and curl manageability. 

#37 –  Nubiance Spa & Salon – Indeed, Master Hairstylist and Color Specialist Vicki Pouncie proudly possess a very creative, eclectic, and classy sense of style that emanates from her heart, mind and soul, which she takes great pride in displaying to her clients via her innovative hairstyling techniques and exceptional hair color application services. 

#38 SoKai Salon & Spa – Sokai Spa Salon is an upscale salon located in the heart of the East Atlanta Village. Forever finding new ways to pamper clients, Sokai Spa Salon offers a fun, relaxing atmosphere in which clients can feel comfortable and at ease.  

#39 – Suite 20 Salon & Day Spa – We have more than 20 years of industry experience, and our licensed dieticians and stylists take pride in providing personalized services to help you look and feel your best. Kristy Gaiters, our owner, strives to provide the community with affordable and healthy services. 

Con’t 175 + more nail salon & spas, click here100 BLACK-OWNED BUSINESSES TO SUPPORT 365 DAYS A YEAR

BLACK -OWNED HOME DECOR AND FURNITURE

#40 – Harmony Designs Furniture & Interior – located 115 SOUTH 4TH AVE  MT. VERNON NY 10550; PH: 914-699-0809

#41 – Home Beautiful Decor – located Address: 502 W Kearney St #200, Mesquite, TX 75149; PH:(972) 288-0705

#42-  Ali Sandifer Studio – located in Detriot, MI. Design is our passion and craft is our medium. Ali Sandifer is a design studio and workshop with a particular fondness for furniture. Our work is born from a simple belief that design, material, and craft must work together to achieve intelligence, beauty, and longevity.

#43 – Lakay Designs –  located in Ohio. THE  PLACE FOR ALL YOUR AFRICAN INSPIRED HOME AND BUSINESS DECOR. Home is home, and all areas of the home must be ‘home’ to the occupants. But this can only be achieved when the ambiance of the home is fascinating. Nothing however can make any home attractive except the unique decor of the home.

#44- Uhuru Furniture & Collectibles – located 832 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19130; PH:(215) 546-9616 Secondhand furniture & decor, with sales supporting the African People’s Education and Defense Fund.

BLACK OWNED BANKS

#45 – 65 – (21 Black-Owned Banks) – click here for an interactive map http://blackoutcoalition.org/black-u-s-banks/

RETAIL STORES OWNED BY BLACK MEN 

#66 – Kimchi Socks – Jason V. Holmes a native of New Orleans is stirring up competition in the very low-tech industry of socks. This brother is turning his passion into a great business model, as well as giving back to the community.

#67 – Talley & Twine -was founded on two principles: legacy and lifestyle. We want to set the standard for future generations, and we want to look good doing it. The number seven on the face of our watches represents completion while giving our timepieces a distinct look that sets us apart from other brands.

# 68 –  Mechael Grey  Footwear – Superior Design comes from a concept… A concept derived from experiences in the world around us, or the truly imaginative mind. Life, travels, studies, technique, and my passion for creation is the very DNA of MICHAEL GREY FOOTWEAR. A distinctive blend of Industrial design + architecture, combined with vintage looks of years before, form my unique line.

BLACK OWNED FOOD BRANDS IN YOUR LOCAL STORE 

#69 – Freedom Paper Company  – Freedom Paper Company LLC (FPC) is a privately owned distributor of bathroom tissue and other paper products headquartered in Baltimore Maryland. The company is unique from other corporations as it is born from the foundation of grassroots movement combined with the best of corporate culture and business acumen.

#70 –  Michele’s Food – Sunday mornings at the Hoskins home began with a gathering and a tradition of delicious homemade waffles, a variety of breakfast meats and a special concoction of honey, cream and butter that was made just for the occasion.  This secret syrup recipe was created by America Washington, a former slave, and the great, great, great grandmother of the only daughter in the household, Michele Hoskins.  America Washington created the recipe in the 1800s as an alternative to molasses for her plantation owner’s family.In the early 1980’s, this family delicacy was passed down to Michele from her mother and she continued the tradition by making it for her three (3) daughters and friends. “My mother inherited that secret recipe and when I married, it was given to me.”  The pancake syrup soon became the talk of the neighborhood. Its delicate honey taste and its rich, creamy consistency brought compliments from all that tasted it and ultimately requests for more!

#71 – 2TWater –  2T Waters, LLC – is committed to introducing premium beverages that are made with the finest quality of water. We are a health conscious company that mainly focuses on health beverages. We believe our water source is one of the purest natural springs known with no artificial mineral additives or demineralization.We specialize in presenting different beverages using our water source to provide our consumers with the healthiest beverages possible.

#72 – TGIN (Thank God I’m Natural) –  When Harvard graduate, Chris-Tia Donaldson  started her first law firm job, she wore a wig to disguise the fact that her hair was naturally kinky.

BLACK-OWNED HEALTH CONSCIOUS FOODS 

FOOD/DRINKS

#73 – Khepra’s Raw Food Juice Bar – Located at 402 H Street NE in Washington DC, this award-winning juice bar/ restaurant was founded by Khepra Anu, a raw foodist who has dedicated his life to sharing his knowledge of systematic fasting and detoxification.

#74 – Karyn’s – Located at 1901 N. Halsted in Chicago, IL, this Black-owned restaurant serves cooked, conscious vegan comfort foods such as pizza, burgers, fries, meatloaf, taco salad, eggplant, and more. They also have a well-complimented vegan brunch and serve raw dishes for lunch and dinner.

#75 – The Grain Cafe – Located at 4222 W Pico Blvd in Los Angeles, CA, this restaurant appeals to vegans and vegetarians as well as meat-eaters. They serve veggie wraps as well as deluxe burgers with red berry ice tea or mint lemonade. Even their coffee is natural and organic.

 #76 –  Tassili’s Raw Reality  –  Located at 1059 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd Atlanta, Georgia is a fast casual restaurant located in Atlanta, Georgia.  They specialize in raw vegan cuisines and provide a unique variety of raw vegan entrees like spicy kale salad, kale wraps, and more.

#78 –  Land of Kush – Located at 840 N. Eutaw Street, Baltimore, MD Voted 2015 Best Vegan Crab Cake by Baltimore’s City Paper!  They are the Ultimate Vegetarian Experience!  THE LAND of KUSH inspires you to feed your spirit.  They are Vegan Soul!  Celebrate a new way of life with healthier food.

HAIRCARE

#79 – CURLS: This Black-owned company is a nationally recognized leader in the natural hair care industry for their unique formulations of certified organic ingredients. Supported by Halle Berry, Alicia Keys, Nia Long, Tia Mowry, and more.

#80 – Curl Kitchen: This Chicago-based company sells natural/ organic-based hair care products tailored to those who wish to embrace their tresses in its naturally ethnic state. Their products are for women and men with waves, curls, kinks, coils, and/or locs.

#81 – Indigofera Beauty: This Black-owned Etsy store produces a variety of all-natural, chemical-free hair care supplies that are made from plant-based ingredients and infused with essential oils. They are known locally and nationally for selling the best products for natural hair, coils, kinks and locs.

SKINCARE

#82 – Beija-Flor Naturals: This Black-owned Etsy store produces organic skin care and natural hair products. The brand is inspired by the owner’s Brazilian background and uses the best ingredients from the Amazon rain forest to the Savannahs of East Africa.

#83 – Blac Minerals: This Black-owned company sells 100% non-toxic, high quality, high performance, hand-crafted mineral makeup formulated for women of all colors. Their natural makeup products are lightweight, and blendable, helping your skin to breathe.

BLACK-OWNED HANDBAGS 

#84 – Minku – Minku is considered the Hermes of Africa when it comes to handbags. They are all handmade and can take up to 50 hours to complete and are lined with repurposed items of Yoruba ceremonial dress. The Nigerian company was started by founder Kunmi in 2011 and is a family-run business.

#85 – ZAAF – ZAAF offers handcrafted luxury leather handbags made in Ethiopia. They are crafted with the finest materials and produced in a remote Ethiopian village. The company was founded by Abai Schulze, a remarkable CEO who is under the age of 30.

#86 – Gregory Sylvia  – This handbag designer was co-founded by Gregory and Terri “Sylvia” Pope. The husband-wife team started their company in Charlotte, North Carolina and are known for their luxury, elegant handbags crafted from fine leather.

#87 – Adela Dejack – These African-inspired designer handbags are made in Kenya. Their collection of handbags, jewelry, and other accessories are inspired by African shapes, textures, and techniques. Designer Adèle Dejak had plenty of design experience in England and Italy before moving her company to Nairobi, Kenya in 2005.

#88 – Christopher Augmon – Christopher Augmon high-end luxury designer handbags are made in New York and reflect the richness of various cultures. His distinctive handbags can be found in boutiques around the United States and online at augmon.com.These designer handbags are made by many of the designers for both women and men.

BLACK- OWNED SHOE DESIGNERS 

 #89 – Artyce Design –  The vision of Artyce Footwear (named after the designer’s mom) officially came to light in 2004. Candra Palmer (Designer, Owner) brought her dream to life by creating a comfortable and stunning custom footwear collection catering to brides and those attending special events.

#90 – Samantha Shoes – Every woman needs at least one great pair of shoes. Women that wear larger shoe sizes, desire current fashion trends and are frustrated by the lack of availability. Samanta Shoes is dedicated to solving this global problem.

#91 – Amina Abdul Jillil – Born and raised in Anchorage, Alaska Aminah began as a professional dancer in Los Angeles, performing with some of the biggest names in music including Britney Spears and Janet Jackson. She’s appeared in commercials for Pepsi, Mazda and New Balance and recently performed as lead character “Crimson” in Cirque du Soleil’s BELIEVE.

#92 – Jhung Yuro  – Launched in 2005 Jhung Yuro recognized a void in the men’s luxury lifestyle footwear market and filled it with a brand that offers detail, hand craftsmanship and limited availability for its products.

#93 – Fever Shoes and Swimwear – Natischa Harvey’s first foray into the shoe business came via Bakers.  While studying political science at Clark Atlanta University she moonlighted at the store, earning $6 an hour.  She treated it as a “paid internship” and by 2004 knew enough about the industry to open her own boutique

BLACK-OWNED FIRMS THAT HELP OTHER BLACK-OWNED BUSINESSES

#94 – The Front Page Firm  – This firm, launched by PR executive Tosha Whitten Griggs (best known for her work with BET), is a full-service publicity boutique specializing in executive and talent visibility; television and film campaigns; red carpet premieres; and special events. They are known for being the go-to publicists for mainstream/urban media cross-over campaigns. Their clients include Bounce TV, the Queen Latifah Show, the Oprah Winfrey Network, and Spelman College.

#95 – Foote Communications – This firm, launched by marketing and PR veteran Neil Foote (best known for his work with the Tom Joyner Morning Show), combines traditional public relations and content management and social media for entertainers, entrepreneurs, corporations and educational institutions. His services include public relations, graphics & design, social media strategies, web site management, and more. Their clients include the Tom Joyner Morning Show, the African American Museum of Dallas, Rickey Smiley, and J. Anthony Brown.

#96 – BlackPR.com – This company, launched by marketing guru Dante Lee, offers an extensive press release distribution service to all the African American newspapers, magazines, TV and radio stations. For just $150, they can help you get your story in some of the country’s top Black publications, and they can even help you get radio and TV interviews. Their clients include the NAACP, the Tom Joyner Foundation, Tavis Smiley, Iyanla Vanzant, TV One, and BET.

#97 – HBCU Connect – Looking to hire African American college students and graduate? This company, launched by social media pioneer Will Moss, can help you do that for as little as $249. Their online career center offers various options including posting simple job listings to options for banner ad packages and employer showcase listings. Their clients include Microsoft, FedEx, United Negro College Fund, Merck, and many Historically Black Universities and Colleges (HBCUs).

#98 – PR, Etcetera – This company, launched by African American PR veteran Toni Beckham, offers several professional marketing communication services including branding, crisis communications, public relations, media training, and even technical writing/proofing. Their clients include the Bay Area Black Expo, Rainbow/PUSH Silicon Valley Project, the City of Oakland, and the National Coalition of 100 Black Women.

#99 – TaylorMade Media – This company, launched by PR expert, media coach, and best-selling author Karen Taylor Bass, creates strategic public relations, branding, and marketing campaigns for corporations, luxury brands, celebrities, athletes, and entrepreneurs. Karen has been featured on Dr. Oz, CNN, BET, NBC Today, Fox-TV, and in Essence Magazine.

#100 – BBNomics Crowdfunding Site –  Building a Platform to aid Black people in pooling their resource and gain financial independence. BBNomics is all about group reliance, real money wisdom, for our people who want to beat the odds, prove everyone wrong and become a beacon of light in the world by living life with a purpose.

The aim is making an impact by providing a platform for everyone to actively engage in fundamental principles of group economics, group-love, financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and philanthropy. It’s for our people who are serious about taking their lives — and their POWER — to the next level!

By Lynn (@lynnbbnomics) 

100 BLACK-OWNED BUSINESSES TO SUPPORT 365 DAYS A YEAR

To be added to this list and others,  click here [ ].

 

Posted on March 9, 2016 By Staff

Most Black-Owned Businesses Fall Into One of These 9 Categories

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Between 2002 and 2015, black-owned businesses in the U.S. increased 60.5 percent, totaling 2.5 million firms, according to BlackDemographics.com. Almost half of them, or 4 out 10, operate in healthcare and social assistance, and in other services.

Top industries for black-owned businesses

Out of all the 2.5 million businesses owned by blacks in 2015, here is the breakout by industry:

  1. Health care and social assistance – 365,140/ 20 percent
  2. Other services, including repair, maintenance, personal and laundry services sectors – 358,443/ 20 percent
  3. Administrative Support, waste management, and remediation services – totaled 216,763/ 11 percent
  4. Transportation and warehousing – totaled 168,386/ 9 percent
  5. Professional, scientific, technical – totaled 163,761/ 9 percent
  6. Retail – totaled 148,181/ 7.8 percent
  7. Construction – a total of 125,818/ 6.6 percent
  8. Real estate, rental, leasing – totaled 92,655/ 4.8 percent
  9. Arts, entertainment, recreation – a total of 86,357/ 4.5 percent

The remaining 10 percent are in education services, finance, insurance, food service, information, wholesale trade, manufacturing, agriculture, utilities, other industries, and management of other companies.

To read more, visit www.blackdemographics.com/economics/black-owned-businesses/

Posted on March 8, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

First black-owned pharmacy opens in Baconton, GA

Dr. Teresa Mitchell, owner of Total Care Pharmacy, says this is an exciting opportunity for her./ Jarvis

Dr. Teresa Mitchell, owner of Total Care Pharmacy, says this is an exciting opportunity for her./ Jarvis

 

Totalcare Pharmacy

Phone Number  229-787-5765

149 E Walton St, Baconton, GA 31716-7705

At the corner on East Walton Street in Baconton sits a small brick building.  But it’s not just any building, it’s the first black owned pharmacy and a ribbon cutting was held Monday morning to celebrate its opening.

Dr. Teresa Mitchell, owner of Total Care Pharmacy, says this is an exciting opportunity for her. “I’m very excited to be a leader and entrepreneur in the area,” said Mitchell.

No stranger to Baconton, Dr. Mitchell has been a practicing pharmacist for over 20 years and she’s also from Mitchell County. Recently she taught the pharmacy technician program at Albany Technical College. Being an entrepreneur is something Mitchell has dreamed about for a while.

“We started back in September 2014, and for me I would say that it was a God move,” Mitchell said. “As far as the area, it was a seed that my father planted before he passed. He told me that if I ever wanted to start a business, to start it in Baconton because it was the hub, it was the center, it was going to grow.”

Source: 

Posted on March 4, 2016 By Staff With 11 comments

Black Financial Expert Releases the World’s First Investment Book For Children

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Wesley Learns to Invest by Prince Dykes is the world’s first investment book that targets children readers. The fictional book is about an 11-year old boy (Wesley, named after his 4-year son) who wants a gaming system, but instead learns about the importance of hard work, investing, and choosing stocks wisely. In the story, the boy’s father teaches him about the stock market, setting goals, and making smart decisions related to finances.

Wesley Learns to Invest by Prince Dykes is the world’s first investment book that targets children readers. The fictional book is about an 11-year old boy (Wesley, named after his 4-year son) who wants a gaming system, but instead learns about the importance of hard work, investing, and choosing stocks wisely. In the story, the boy’s father teaches him about the stock market, setting goals, and making smart decisions related to finances.

 

kidsinvest

Black Financial Expert Releases the World’s First Investment Book For Children

Wesley Learns to Invest uses real world experiences to teach children valuable financial principles and practices while they are still at a young age. The book emphasizes that nobody can always have what they want. Children wanting material things have an opportunity to learn about managing finances, and even investing, from this innovative narrative.

The book was released in June 2015, and is already very popular – especially in the state of Hawaii where the author is based. It has been added to several local school libraries and public libraries throughout the state. Its currently available for purchase at Amazon.comBarnesandNoble.com, Books-a-Million, Kindle, and iBook. Order yours today!

About the Author

Prince Dykes is a 31-year old active duty service member stationed at Pearl Harbor, but he has a lot of business and finance experience and knowledge that inspired him to author an investment book for children. He works as a logistics specialist in the military with 12 1/2 years of responsibilities related to finances, he has an associate’s degree in general studies, bachelor’s degree in management, and Master’s in Business Administration (MBA), and he has a Series 65 license (Federal Investment Advisor), a Series 63 license (Securities Agent), a life insurance license, and a health/accident license.

In 2012, he started Royal Financial Investment Group, which  invests in Black-owned businesses like Dewalt Brewing Company (winner of several beer festival awards) and The Global Art Gallery, which was listed on the Game Changers List for 2016 as selected by the National Association of Experts, Writers, and Speakers.

Royal Financial Investment Group has also created and published the world’s first captain venture app for the general public Investors and Business Owners Hub (IABOH). Available at the Apple app store and Google Play, it enables entrepreneurs to find investors while opening the general public up to the world of capital venture.

The firm has been featured on various Internet radio shows, and in the True Citizen newspaper, iHeart Radio’s “The Rick Hamada Show”, Fortune Magazine, The Huffington Post and Apple/Andriod apps.  They were also featured in the January 2016 edition of Fortune Magazine.

Dykes is also married with a 4-year old son Wesley.

For more details about Royal Financials, visit www.royalfinancials.com

CONTACT:
Royal Financial Investment Group

Twitter: https://twitter.com/royalfinancials

Email: prince@royalfinancials.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/Royalfinancialgroup

Phone: 706-691-6386

Black Financial Expert Releases the World’s First Investment Book For Children

 

Posted on February 26, 2016 By Staff With 2 comments

FIRST EVER BLACK-OWNED BANK — THE FOUNDER WAS ONCE A SLAVE!

Rev. William Washington Browne, founder of first black-owned bank

Rev. William Washington Browne, founder of first black-owned bank

FIRST EVER BLACK-OWNED BANK — THE FOUNDER WAS ONCE A SLAVE!

From slave to bank owner

Reverend William Washington Browne established the bank to serve the financial interests of black depositors. He wanted a bank that would serve to protect the finances of black clients to ensure their finances could not be monitored by whites.

The name of the bank came from the Grand Fountain United Order of True Reformers, a black fraternal organization established by Browne in 1849. Racial tension remained high after the Civil War, so Browne established the first black-owned bank in Richmond, Virginia, which initially operated out of his home. Two years later, the bank moved to its location several blocks away at 604-608 North Second Street.

Thrived despite the economic depression

The bank did very well. When the U.S. economic depression of 1893 hit and people were panicking and rushing to the banks to withdraw their money, Browne’s bank was one of the few that survived. In fact, it was the only bank in Richmond that was able to pay out the full value of it’s customers’ accounts and remain in full operation.

After Browne’s death in 1897, the bank continued in operation. It also expanded into other areas, such as newspaper, real estate, a retirement home and a building and loan association. It’s growth included operations in 24 states.

The downfall

However, under the new president, Reverend William Lee Taylor, the bank was mismanaged, often making unsecured loans which defaulted. The straw that broke the camel’s back was a bank embezzlement of $50,000 by the bank’s cashier. By 1910, the State Corporation Commission ordered the bank closed. But, it remains in history as the first bank owned by African Americans in the United States.

FIRST EVER BLACK-OWNED BANK — THE FOUNDER WAS ONCE A SLAVE!

Source: 
Read more by visiting www.blackpast.org/aah/true-reformers-bank-1888-1910

 

Posted on February 16, 2016 By Staff With 1 comment

TOP FIVE BLACK OWNED RESTAURANTS IN OAKLAND, CA

 

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TOP FIVE BLACK OWNED RESTAURANTS IN OAKLAND, CA

If you‘re looking to sample a little local flavor while taking a break from the your daily routine, stop by one of these great locations,  in Oakland, CA  neighborhood. You won’t regret it! Join the #eachandeveryfriday movement and help us create #2millionjobs

#1. Lena’s Soul Food Cafe
1462 High St
Oakland, CA 94601
b/t Bancroft Ave & 14th St – East Oakland
Phone number (510) 842-3510
Business website: lenassoulfoodcafe.com

Feedback: V J. Oakland, CA 5 Stars!
OMG, the food at this restaurant is so good I eat it daily to my shame. When I first found out about it I was skeptical and thought it was going to bed of those wanna be soul food places. To my surprise it was real soul food. I was eating so much I had to cut back not only on portion size but what I was consuming. Everything is good there I mean everything. I am very picky eater with taste and texture. They are so accommodating that they were all separate your side dishes to get the chicken or fish wet.

The food is fresh and hot not over salted and seasoned to my idea of perfection. I am in love with this place!

The staff is incredible and smart! They listen! I have yet to get the wrong items. They make you want to come back! Everyone is polite and ready to serve you with a Big smile. The portion size is perfect and so is the price$

A BIG Thank You to all the staff at Lens’s for tickling my taste buds am making my bellyfull.

#2. Miss Ollie’s
901 Washington St
Oakland, CA 94607
b/t 10th St & 9th St – Old Oakland
Get Directions
Phone number (510) 285-6188
Business website: realmissolliesoakland.com

Feedback: Christopher B. North Hollywood, CA 5 Stars!

Listen… if you want to understand what healthy soul food taste like. Carry yo but on down to Oakland and allow your mouth to sink it to the creamiest, most delicate, mouth watering soul food around.

Sar Ah is a master chef. Her flavors are all natural and they merge together so well. Her recipes take you back to a time where your grandma took her time and cooked so long that the house smelled like the last meal she cooked-all the time.

What a savory treat this place offers.

The servers are polite and attentive. And the portions are super on point.

I really digged the oxtail and rice. Good googly moogly! I’m going to bolt bus back from LA for the chicken ;) I heard it’s the best thing going. You did that Ms. Sar Ah! My friend and I sat at the bar and we were treated to beautiful new company. The patrons were as down home and friendly as the food.

I could not help but try a few different drinks because the cute bartender was a definite mixologist! She had style in her tending.

I watched Ms Sa Rah as she directed her kitchen with the utmost grace. I was so impressed I wanted to take a selfie with her. But I didn’t want to take her out of her zone.

This place is a must stop if your in Oakland! Get on that oxtail. Forreal.

And enjoy the journey down gourmet soul food memory lane.

#3. Home of Chicken and Waffles
444 Embarcadero W
Oakland, CA 94607
b/t Broadway & Franklin St – Jack London Square
Phone number (510) 836-4446
Business website: homeofchickenandwaffles.com

Feedback: David P. Fresno, CA 5 Stars!
Came before the super bowl for a bite to eat..great chicken and waffles and garlic fries. Would definitely come back again!

#4. Picán
2295 Broadway
Oakland, CA 94612
b/t Grand Ave & 23rd St – Uptown
Phone number (510) 834-1000
Business website: picanrestaurant.com

Feedback: Chives S. Antioch, CA 5 Stars!
Update review. Went lastnight on a Sunday very packed house with some soft R&B music playing in the back ground to a candle lit restaurant. You must, I do mean must take your lady here major brownie points. Lol. Will be back very soon.

#5. Brown Sugar Kitchen
2534 Mandela Pkwy
Oakland, CA 94607
b/t Campbell St & 26th St – West Oakland
Phone number (510) 839-7685
Business website: brownsugarkitchen.com

Feedback: PG H. San Rafael, CA 5 Stars!
What a great charming place with great tasting food, coffee and service. Get there early unless you are one for long waits.

TOP FIVE BLACK OWNED RESTAURANTS IN OAKLAND, CA

 

Posted on February 11, 2016 By Staff With 9 comments

Muskogee, Oklahoma Black Business District You May Not Know Anything About

Bird's-eye_View_of_Business_Section,_Muskogee,_OK

Muskogee, Oklahoma Black Business District You May Not Know Anything About

Even before the city of Muskogee came into existence, the Three Forks region was rich with cultural diversity. A large African American presence has existed in the region since it became a part of the U.S. following the Louisiana Purchase.

Both free and enslaved blacks were a part of the Indian removals that brought members of the Creek and Cherokee tribes to the Indian Territory. Interviews of Cherokee and Creek freedmen indicate that those held as slaves had a surprising amount of latitude. They worked almost as tenant farmers, choosing their own home sites, earning money from skilled labor, even owning guns for hunting.

Following the Civil War, many of the now freed tribal members returned to their former homes in the bottom lands of the Three Rivers. They rebuilt their homes on land they could now claim as their own. They also built institutions such as schools, churches and farming cooperatives, like cotton gins.

The antebellum years also brought an influx of “state blacks,” those former slaves of the South seeking a better life in the Indian nations. At first, there was some mistrust between the tribal freedmen and state blacks, but over time the two groups melded together.

When the mostly black and Indian community of Creek Agency became the new railroad town of Muskogee in 1872, the population continued to be dominated by freedmen. In Muskogee’s first municipal election, there were more black voters than white.

This gradually changed when the federal court was placed in Muskogee and an influx of attorneys came to town. The Dawes Commission also brought a battalion of government workers and shifted the demographics of the city.

Still, Muskogee’s black community was vibrant and successful. Despite the injustices of segregation, which became the law at statehood in 1907, freedmen descendants built businesses, pursued quality education in their schools, established churches and organized civic clubs.

Though some black residents worked as general laborers, porters and domestics, just as many occupied skilled trades as plumbers, bricklayers, machinists, butchers, tailors and carpenters. They owned small businesses such as grocery stores, millineries, livery stables, and blacksmith shops.

There were a number of African American members of the professions as well, working as lawyers, teachers, physicians, surgeons, dentists and pharmacists. Black entrepreneurs opened funeral homes, clothing emporiums, restaurants, hotels, newspaper offices and photography studios.

The black business district clustered along Second Street and Market Street and served the black neighborhoods that bordered these corridors.

Smaller businesses could also be found within those neighborhoods where elementary schools named Langston, Dunbar, Douglass and Wheatley were built.

A Negro Business Directory published in 1942 proudly proclaimed that Muskogee and neighboring Taft had a black population of 15,000. Driven by a well-organized black businessmen’s club, the directory stated that “Muskogee Negroes enjoy a (prestige) unequaled anywhere else in America.”

Quoting a long-time Muskogee resident, the publication proclaimed, “There’s more Negro lawyers, doctors, realtors, etc., to the square foot than there is anywhere else in the world.”

The success and vibrancy of this part of Muskogee’s past should be celebrated as testimony to what a community can accomplish when it strives for the best.

Muskogee, Oklahoma Black Business District You May Not Know Anything About

Sources:

PDF file 

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Posted on February 8, 2016 By Staff With 1 comment

DETROIT 9-YEAR-OLD LAUNCH A CLOTHING BOUTIQUE FOR BOYS

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Location is Church Boy Clothing at 8900 E. Jefferson Detroit, MI 48214 (off of Marina drive)

Address: 8900 E. Jefferson Detroit, MI 48214

Phone: 586-894-8335

Hours: The store is open Thursday-Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

First, his dress code was different from the rest, always wearing dress clothes while going to church, among other occasions. In church, most kids would wear casual attire while he would be wearing suits. It began quite early for him; he asked how to tie a bowtie at the age of four, something that wasn’t readily available for children of his age. When he turned 7 years old, he already started thinking of how he could provide a place where young boys would purchase formal wear.

At some point, Hill asked his grandma why children used to attend church services dressed casually. His grandma told him that such clothes are expensive. This inspired him further to think of providing a destination where such clothes would be affordable. But it wasn’t that alone. Understanding that there are those who would still stick to casual wear, regardless, he thought of starting a business that offered both official and casual attire.

To put the idea into reality, Hill reveals that he received support from his grandma, parents, family members, and his church. Ironically, his parents didn’t take him seriously when he started talking about starting a business; yet, he persistently asked for it. Finally, when he was seven-years-old, they managed to get for him a business license.

Getting a location for the business was another challenge, but lucky enough, Vees Boutique allowed Hill to get a spot in her shop.

Running a business isn’t that easy, particularly for a young boy who’s still going to school. Asked how he manages to balance school and his business, he said: “First I have to see what day I have an activity and I know what to do. I play football, piano, sing and I’m a worship leader at church.  I do my homework between 4:00-4:30 and I practice the piano at night. I get all A’s and B’s and I’ve been on the honor roll since kindergarten (Now in the 5th grade). I’ll work my store on Friday evenings and Saturday Afternoons. My grandmother and Ms. Vee will operate it the rest of the days.”

The name of his boutique is Church Boy Clothing and it opened in November in Detroit. His store provides different clothes and accessories, including socks, cufflinks, belts, men bracelets, among others.

He’s looking forward to being either a lawyer or obstetrician, and he’s planning to study either at Princeton or Howard University. To meet his college tuition needs, he’s planning on saving his profits.

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Posted on January 31, 2016 By Staff With 7 comments

BLACK MAN, TURNS A PASSION FOR SOCKS INTO A BOLD BUSINESS IDEA

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Yes,  Jason V. Holmes a native of New Orleans is stirring up competition in the very low-tech industry of socks. This brother is turning his passion into a great business model as well as giving back. Website: http://kimchisocks.com/

Kimchi Socks is here to take care of your gift giving needs when flowers and candy is not enough. Kimchi Socks is working to become the leader in helping family members, long distance friends, professionals, and digital nomads send gifts remotely. Relationships are important personally and business wise. When you are busy and not at near to build those relationships. You need Kimchi Socks’ help. You need something that you can send as a good gesture from you care. You don’t want to send flowers because they die. You don’t want to send candy because the moment they eat it, you are no longer on their mind. You want to send socks as a gift. This is something they can wear often year round. Also, when people ask them about the cool Kimchi Socks you sent them, they will think and mention you. I am a 28 years old black man from New Orleans. I am currently in the Air Force stationed in S. Korea and I run this business part time but in 2017 I will leave the Air Force. I am hoping for this business to support my family while I go back to University of New Orleans for Computer Engineering.

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Kimchi Socks not only sells socks but we also sponsor social projects with a portion of our profits. Below are the projects we sponsor because we believe in the positive mission they are set out to achieve. Therefore, you are not only buying socks but also helping us make the world a better place.  http://kimchisocks.com/index.php/about/who-kimchi-socks-sponsor/

BLACK MAN, TURNS A PASSION FOR SOCKS INTO A BOLD BUSINESS IDEA 

Make sure to join Kimchi Socks on all social media:

Website: http://kimchisocks.com/

Twitter: @KimchiSocks 

IG: @kimchisocks

Facebook: Kimichi Socks

And since it’s Friday, make sure you gift a pair today!

Kimchi Socks is one of the many small business taking on the challenge to create #2MillionJobs in America. This is how we create our own solutions to our own problems.

Posted on January 22, 2016 By Staff With 1 comment

Top 7 Black-Owned Firms That Help Other Black-Owned Businesses

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According to federal statistics, there are more than 2 million Black-owned businesses in the country, but many are struggling to stay afloat. Many generate revenues of less than $100,000 a year, and have few employees. So what’s the plan for 2016?
Here are 7 Black-owned marketing, public relations, and diversity recruitment companies that can help:

#1 – The Front Page Firm: This firm, launched by PR executive Tosha Whitten Griggs (best known for her work with BET), is a full service publicity boutique specializing in executive and talent visibility; television and film campaigns; red carpet premieres; and special events. They are known for being the go-to publicists for mainstream/urban media cross-over campaigns. Their clients include Bounce TV, the Queen Latifah Show, the Oprah Winfrey Network, and Spelman College.

#2 – Foote Communications: This firm, launched by marketing and PR veteran Neil Foote (best known for his work with the Tom Joyner Morning Show), combines traditional public relations and content management and social media for entertainers, entrepreneurs, corporations and educational institutions. His services include public relations, graphics & design, social media strategies, web site management, and more. Their clients include the Tom Joyner Morning Show, the African American Museum of Dallas, Rickey Smiley, and J. Anthony Brown.

#3 – BlackPR.com: This company, launched by marketing guru Dante Lee, offers an extensive press release distribution service to all the African American newspapers, magazines, TV and radio stations. For just $150, they can help you get your story in some of the country’s top Black publications, and they can even help you get radio and TV interviews. Their clients include the NAACP, the Tom Joyner Foundation, Tavis Smiley, Iyanla Vanzant, TV One, and BET.

#4 – HBCU Connect: Looking to hire African American college students and graduate? This company, launched by social media pioneer Will Moss, can help you do that for as little as $249. Their online career center offers various options including posting simple job listings to options for banner ad packages and employer showcase listings. Their clients include Microsoft, FedEx, United Negro College Fund, Merck, and many Historically Black Universities and Colleges (HBCUs).

#5 – PR, Etcetera: This company, launched by African American PR veteran Toni Beckham, offers several professional marketing communication services including branding, crisis communications, public relations, media training, and even technical writing/proofing. Their clients include the Bay Area Black Expo, Rainbow/PUSH Silicon Valley Project, the City of Oakland, and the National Coalition of 100 Black Women.

#6 – TaylorMade Media: This company, launched by PR expert, media coach and best-selling author Karen Taylor Bass, creates strategic public relations, branding, and marketing campaigns for corporations, luxury brands, celebrities, athletes, and entrepreneurs. Karen has been featured on Dr. Oz, CNN, BET, NBC Today, Fox-TV, and in Essence Magazine.

#7 – BBNomics Crowdfunding Site:  Building a Platform to aid Black people in pooling their resource and gain financial independence.

BBNomics is all about group reliance, real money wisdom, for our people who want to beat the odds, prove everyone wrong and become a beacon of light in the world by living life with a purpose.

The aim is making an impact by providing a platform for everyone to actively engage in fundamental principles of group economics, group-love, financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and philanthropy. It’s for our people who are serious about taking their lives — and their POWER — to the next level!

Source: blog.blackbusiness.org

Posted on January 7, 2016 By Staff With 4 comments

Welcome to Afrikmall, the unique African Mall

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What is Afrikmall?

Afrikmall is a place that Africans living in Colorado can call home, providing a range of business services, as well as cultural, community and social opportunities and events. There are many thousands of Africans living in Colorado, from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia, and other African countries.

What will Afrikmall offer?

Afrikmall will provide the best of African business, entertainment, products, services and cultural experience to the general public. This may include African restaurants and cuisine, a grocery store, a coffee shop, a beauty salon, art shops, clothing retailers and business office space, along with an event center and a cultural center. It is also envisioned that Afrikmall will also house a credit union or bank.

Who is behind the project?

Cobina Adu Lartson, Ph.D., is the CEO of Afrikmall, and also a science educator with Denver Public Schools; Edward K. Mensah is chief operating officer of Afrikmall and executive director of TMG Global; Albert K. Quartey is the chief financial officer of Afrikmall and also a supervisor with Unicircuit Inc.; Emmanuel K. Eliason is Afrikmall’s chief business development officer, as well as the president and CEO of Eliason Consulting Group; Seth Assabil, Afrikmall’s chief of facilities, works in security.

Where is it located?

Afrikmall will be located at 10180 E. Colfax Ave. in Aurora, in a 56,281 square-foot building on three floors. Afrikmall, LLC, the management company overseeing Afrikmall operations, has a long-term lease on the property, which was purchased by 10180 E. Colfax, LLC, an ownership entity created by Colorado-based Northstar Commercial Partners.

Why was that area selected?

The Downtown Aurora location provides proximity to thousands of expected visitors to Afrikmall. Afrikmall is located within the Aurora Cultural Arts District on the Colfax corridor, in a radius that includes the Stapleton and Lowry developments, and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical.
Welcome to Afrikmall, the unique African Mall. We are changing the customer shopping experience, one city at a time.

When will it open?

 An official ribbon cutting ceremony took place on July 16, 2015. For current update click here.

Posted on January 3, 2016 By Staff

Black Families in These 10 Cities Are Doing the Best Economically — But They Aren’t Exactly Rich

Black Families in These 10 Cities Are Doing the Best Economically — But They Aren’t Exactly Rich

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The Atlanta Journal-Constitution recently published a survey of the top 10 U.S. cities in which African Americans are doing the best economically. The ratings were based on median household income, home ownership rate, and the percent of those self-employed.

Here are the top 10:

  1. Atlanta, GA – Median household income: $41,047. Home ownership rate: 51.5 percent. Self-employed: 17.1 percent.
  2. Raleigh, NC – Median household income: $42,285. Home ownership rate: 46.7 percent. Self-employed: 12.8 percent.
  3. Washington, DC – Median household income: $64,896. Home ownership rate: 49.2 percent. Self-employed: 15.1 percent.
  4. Charlotte, NC – Median household income: $36,522. Home ownership rate: 43.9 percent. Self-employed: 13.6 percent.
  5. Baltimore, MD – Median household income: $47,898. Home ownership rate: 46.2 percent. Self-employed: 15 percent.
  6. Virginia Beach-Norfolk, VA – Median household income: $40,677. Home ownership rate: 43.8 percent. Self-employed: 13.2 percent.
  7. Orlando, FL – Median household income: $33,982. Home ownership rate: 43.8% percent. Self-employed: 11 percent.
  8. Miami, FL – Median household income: $36,749. Home ownership rate: 44.9 percent. Self-employed: 11.2 percent.
  9. Richmond, VA – Median household income: $38,899. Home ownership rate: 47.8 percent. Self-employed: 12.7 percent.
  10. San Antonio, TX – Median household income: $41,681. Home ownership rate: 40.8 percent. Self-employed: 9.3 percent.

Source: Blog.Blackbusiness.org

Read more at www.ajc.com/gallery/news/10-cities-where-african-americans-are-doing-best-e/gCQpt/

Posted on December 18, 2015 By Staff