Tag archives: black organizations

Invest in the First Black Woman-Owned Cafe & Farmers Market Franchise That Will Be Owned by the Community

Nationwide — Roots & Vine Produce and Café, spearheaded by Ena Jones, a single mother of 3, born and raised in Chicago, has set its Grand Opening for this fall 2018 on Chicago’s South Side in the Morgan Park Community. The plan is to create a Wi-Fi friendly café with a healthy menu, coffee, smoothies, and juices as well as tempting pastries.

Their in-house farmers market, supplied with fresh produce and bulk dry goods, are grown from black farmers nationwide. The company aspires to be a low cost and cashless grocery chain at the convenience store level to help eliminate food deserts across the country.

With nearly a quarter of the American population living in a food desert, access to fresh and healthy produce is crucial in the battle to reduce diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and other food-related illnesses in our families. Stop by to join in healthy discussions with their #GreenTableTalks, food demos and workshops; as they create jobs and unique franchise opportunities for people of the community.

#GreeTableTalk

Roots & Vine is a solution looking for investors. There is an opportunity to join their mission and invest at BuyTheBlock.com, with as little as $100. You can look at their offering and truly encourage the community, family and friends to live a healthy life. The momentum of Roots & Vine Produce and Café as they sprout up to bring water to food deserts across the country will quickly make the new startup a household name.

This startup is dedicated to addressing the problem of urban food deserts and revitalizing blighted communities. Connecting farmers directly with consumers and employing community residents, Roots & Vine aims to strengthen communities in several ways:

#1 – Offering fresh produce and bulk dry goods at the convenience store level.
#2 – Providing Farmers an economic opportunity to market their products in every store.
#3 – Providing local employment opportunities in serving communities.
#4 – Providing Communal Space in a daily open, free Wi-Fi café.
#5 – The café will offer food demos, workshops, and education on nutrition and meal planning that will enable those of the community to take control of their own health.

About the founder

Ena Jones is a caterer and seasoned entrepreneur with twenty years of experience and counting. She is also a self-published writer & owner of Everyday Butterfly Home Spa Collection, a self-care product line of 100% natural and organic ingredients.

Notes for Editors: Invest in their effort and bring water to the desert, visit their Buy the Block page at https://buytheblock.com/campaign/connecting-farmers-to-people-reconnecting-people-to-real-food

PRESS CONTACT:
Ena Jones
Roots & Vine Produce and Café Inc.
773-979-0199
EJones@RootsAndVineInc.com

Posted on October 6, 2018 By Staff With 1 comment

It’s True! More African Americans Are Investing in the Stock Market

african_americans_investors_stock_market

A recent national study by Chicago-based Ariel Investments shows that more black Americans are investing in the stock market. For years, blacks stayed away from stock investments, but that trend is beginning to change.

67% of Blacks are investing

According to the study, stock market investing has grown among the black population over the years. In 1998, 57 percent of blacks were investing in stocks or stock mutual funds. By 2010, that number had grown to 60 percent, and today 67 percent of blacks invest in stocks or stock mutual funds. One reason suggested is that more employers are offering 401K programs for their employees. Since employers match 401K deposits up to various amounts, black employees consider this a very important reason to invest and grow wealth.

Investment attitudes different based on race

Investment attitudes and behaviors differ between blacks and whites. Blacks and Hispanics invest less money, and their investments are in safer yet low-returning assets, making their wealth levels about 90 percent lower than the wealth levels of median whites, even when their level of income is only 40 percent lower. This has an effect on the growth of overall wealth.

But wait, there’s more!

In addition, while blacks always considered their homes to be their “best overall investment,” that, too, is changing, falling from 61 percent in 2004 to its current level of 37 percent. How they view stock investing, however, is changing in the opposite direction. In 2004, only 28 percent of blacks felt that stocks were their best overall investment. But in the recent survey, that number increased to 41 percent.

What all of this may point to is closing the gap in wealth inequality between black and white Americans as the upward trend for more black investors in the stock market continues.

Would you like to join an investment group? Click here.
For more details about the study, visit www.arielinvestments.com/content/view/3006/1850/

 

Posted on December 6, 2017 By Staff With 1 comment

BUY BLACK ECONOMICS 2ND ANNUAL BLACK BUSINESS CONTEST

black_women_fastest_growing_business_segment

If you’ve followed BBNomics or Buy Black Economics social media networks, you know we are kicking up our efforts to raise awareness about Black Businesses.  We’ve launched our first annual campaign to support businesses that support our communities. We are utilizing Crowdsourcing to find these black businesses and their customers. All throughout July customers can Nominate a Black Business that exceeded their expectations!

This contest will allow black businesses gain access to capital and garner support from our community, meanwhile rewarding all contributors with prizes for their nominations and support.  Do you know of a black business that supports the community? Did you visit a black business that fulfilled your need immediately and had impeccable service? Let us know!

By appealing to our customers, we hope to grow our community of supporters and to increase business awareness, especially among our young people.

Here is your chance to win the following:

  • 1st Prize Buy Black Economics Pop Up in your city and your location
  • 2nd One Year Platinum Business Listing on Buy Black Economics  *value* $600*
  • 3rd  Prize winner will receive $100 gift card from our favorite BOB. 
  • 4th  Prize Four (2) fourth place winners will receive a $25 gift card to several BOB’s.

Each Black Business Nomination, during the month of June will enter the entrepreneur and the nominee in a drawing for a chance to win prizes. You can nominate businesses in the comment section below. 

Each time you nominate a (BOB) Black Owned Business, during June, the nominee will be added to the drawing. 

You may nominate people/businesses in one category, a few select categories or every category.  Please provide as much of the information requested as possible so we may notify your nominee of their nomination and instruct them on next steps.  We do not share with nominees who actually nominated them.  You may nominate as many deserving people/businesses as you like in the same category but will have to submit a new form for each one.

You will be able to nominate businesses in any or all of the following categories:

How you’ll Enter:

  • Write a compelling story about how a Black Business “Wow’d” you. 
  • Share the story with us  via email, fb, twitter, linkedin, instagram etc..
  • Tell the business you entered them in Buy Black Economics 2nd Annual Black Business Contest. 

Each nomination received will be entered  in a drawing, each entry earns prizes mentioned above.  BBNomics & Buy Black Economics  method helps us all by creating much-needed jobs, entrepreneurs and something for our community members who support these endeavors.

Want to nominate more than one business?  Great!  Each additional nomination will get you another entry, plus there are extra prizes at for multiple nominations.  The more you nominate the more prizes you are eligible for. A thank-you from BBNomics & Buy Black Economics Team, a free spotlight of your business all year round and a custom-designed t-shirt and much more.

Remember, BBNomics uses 100% of its publicly raised funds to help speed access to capital for up and coming young black entrepreneurs. This contest-driven model allows BBNomics & Buy Black Economics supporters to win prizes while helping to build our community, one business and organization at a time.

The contest starts June 2nd, 2016 and end July 28th, 2016 at 11:59 pm eastern time, so enter now and share it with your friends and family!

  1. Website: https://buyblackeconomics.com/
  2. Twitter: @buyblkeconomics
  3. Intstagram: https://www.instagram.com/buyblackeconomics/
  4. Pinetrest: http://pinterest.com/bbnomics/boards/
  5. Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/bbeconomics/

Rules & Guidelines:

  • Contest valid ONLY at BBNomics & Buy Black Economics (and social media networks), no other site will qualify.
  • No limit to the number of black businesses you can submit to enter the contest.
  • Winners will be randomly selected on July 28th, 2016 and contacted via email or phone the week of August 13th, 2016
  • Winner’s prizes will be mailed from BBNomics. BBNomics reserves the right to choose a new winner.
  • BBNomics reserves the right not to select a winner if, in its sole discretion, no suitable entries are received.
  • Employees, Family member of employees and Partners of BBNomics are ineligible to take part in the contest.
  • Any prize, awards, rewards will be sent to the our contributors after the contest ends and no later than January 28, 2017.

Thank you and best of luck!

Disclaimer:  (Businesses Must have at least 1 year in business, with a track record of success, and a strong outlook for 2017) and nominated by a customer. Businesses can not nominate their self. 

BUY BLACK ECONOMICS

PRESENTS:

2ND ANNUAL BLACK BUSINESS CONTEST

 

Posted on May 28, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

Top Five Black Farmers, Black Farming is back on the rise!

After a Century in Decline, Black Farmers Are Back and on the Rise

These Black farmers don’t stop at healthy food. They’re healing trauma, instilling collective values, and changing the way their communities think about the land.
farm1

Blain Snipstal, second from left, with members of the Black Dirt Farm Collective. Photo courtesy Blain Snipstal.

Blain Snipstal and Aleya Fraser
Farm:Black Dirt Farm Collective
Location: Preston, Maryland
Number of Years Farming: 7
Revered Elder: Harriet Tubman

About 80 miles southeast of Baltimore, Black Dirt leases 2 acres that long have been home to the Black freedom struggle. Harriet Tubman once rescued her parents and nine other people from enslavement in this place, which was one of the first stops on the Underground Railroad.

farmer2

Vegan farmers JoVonna Johnson-Cooke and Eugene Cooke raise corn and other native crops at their Stone Mountain farm. Photo by Nicole Bluh.

Eugene Cooke and JoVanna Johnson-Cooke
Farm: Grow Where You Are Collective
Location: Atlanta and Stone Mountain, Georgia
Number of Years Farming: 14
Revered Elder: Wangari Maathai

Collaboration is also key for the nine members of the Grow Where You Are collective, who operate a 3-acre farm and food forest in Atlanta, as well as a 5-acre farm in the nearby rural community of Stone Mountain.

Yonnette Fleming holds a Rhode Island Red hen at the Hattie Carthan Community Garden. Photo by Quincy Ledbetter.

Yonnette Fleming holds a Rhode Island Red hen at the Hattie Carthan Community Garden. Photo by Quincy Ledbetter.

Yonnette Fleming
Farm: Hattie Carthan Herban Farm
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Number of Years Farming: 16
Revered Elder: Hattie Carthan

Yonette Fleming’s passion for agriculture comes through in the poetic urgency of her words. So it’s surprising to learn she once tried to escape it. She was raised in Guyana, where her family cooperated with indigenous communities to grow coconuts, sugar, rice, and other crops. She took a detour into corporate America before finding her way back to the land.

Lindsey Lunsford gathers peppers at TULIP’s community garden. Photo by Wil Sands.

Lindsey Lunsford gathers peppers at TULIP’s community garden. Photo by Wil Sands.

Lindsey Lunsford
Farm: Tuskegee United Leadership and Innovation Program (TULIP)
Location: Tuskegee, Alabama
Number of Years Farming: 2
Revered Elder: Booker T. Washington

The educator and activist Booker T. Washington once sent a letter to every resident of Tuskegee’s Greenwood neighborhood, encouraging them to grow home gardens in order to build self-sufficiency. Through her work with TULIP, Lindsey Lunsford is continuing his legacy.

Chris Bolden-Newsome shows off a basket of marshmallow root he grew at Bantram’s Garden. Photo by Owen Taylor.

Chris Bolden-Newsome shows off a basket of marshmallow root he grew at Bantram’s Garden. Photo by Owen Taylor.

Chris Bolden-Newsome
Farm: Community Farm and Food Resource Center at Bantram’s Garden (a project of the University of Pennsylvania’s Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative)
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Number of Years Farming: 12
Revered Elders: Rufus and Demalda Newsome (his parents)

Before the “food justice” movement existed in the United States, Black farmers in the Mississippi Delta were cooperating to feed the community. Raised by farmers in that movement, Chris Bolden-Newsome assumed that growing food was something everybody did and was shocked to find otherwise when he moved north. He now manages a 50-bed community garden in his current home of Philadelphia, where he reconnects Black people to their agricultural heritage.

Source: Leah Penniman wrote this article for YES! Magazine. Leah is a farmer and educator based in the Albany, New York, area.

 

 

Posted on May 6, 2016 By Staff With 5 comments

The Presence of Black Businesses in the Community Helps to Reduce Local Crime Rates

black_business_man_mentoring

 

An increase in Black-owned businesses in any local area will result in a decrease of crime, according to Karen Parker, professor of sociology and criminal justice at the University of Delaware.

Parker is also the author of the 2013 study, The African American Entrepreneur – Crime Drop Relationship: Growing African American Business Ownership and Declining Youth Violence, and she says that when we address unemployment, poverty and joblessness in urban areas, we are also addressing the crime rate.

Is she right?

It seems so because according to the finding in her study, since 2001, Black-owned businesses have increased by 60 percent (from 1.1 million businesses to 1.9 million), and the crime rate in those areas that have high volumes of Black businesses has decreased by 29 percent. Why?

Researchers point to three primary reasons for the cause-and-affect discovery.

  • Black-owned business owners serve mentors and positive role models for black youth in particular
  • Black-owned businesses raise morale throughout their communities
  • Black-owned businesses create more local jobs and economic opportunities for African Americans that reverse poverty

Influence is more than economic

Like other business owners, black business owners are very much involved in their communities through business and social organizations, churches and schools. They support the black community by hiring black employees, bringing jobs and infusing more money into their communities.

But it is more than that! Black-owned businesses are a powerful influence to youth and others. They demonstrate that, if they can do it in spite of huge obstacles, others can do it, too. They bring not only economic advantages, but hope.

http://blog.blackbusiness.org/2015/05/black-businesses-community-help-reduce-local-crime-rates.html#.Vx9WWtIrK2w

 

 

Posted on April 26, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

6 Amazing Black Tech Organizations That Are Making a Difference for Young People!

black_girls_code_tech_organization

 

It is no secret that there is a severe shortage of blacks in Silicon Valley. Although more and more minorities are graduating from college with degrees in computer science and computer engineering, many are not getting hired — even though they qualify.

Here are 6 black technology companies that support high-tech job opportunities for black youth:

#1 – Black Girls Code: this non-profit organization established in 2011 offers workshops and after-school programs to young girls of color with the goal to grow the number of black girls seeking careers in technology. The organization teaches young girls in underrepresented communities skills such as computer coding and programming languages.

#2 – New Me, Inc: this company was started in 2011 by Angela Benton, technology expert and entrepreneur. The company teaches entrepreneurs, particularly women and minorities, to identify and use their non-traditional backgrounds to create thriving businesses.

#3 – Teens Exploring Technology: this organization helps young men of color from low-income communities to learn skills that will turn them into technology leaders. The organization was established in 2010 and their programs are open to young men of color from grades 7 to 11.

#4 – NSBE, Jr: this organization helps young black students envision themselves in STEM careers (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) by providing students in grades 6–12 with fun, educational STEM activities and events. They also offer NSBE and corporate-sponsored scholarships to students entering college to major in STEM fields.

#5 – All Star Code: this non-profit organization prepares young men of color for careers in technology fields. Their programs provide mentorship, exposure to the technology industry, and intensive training in computer science. The program is located in New York City and is FREE for all accepted students and includes daily transportation and lunch.

#6 – Yes We Code: the goal of this organization is to help urban youth create promising futures in technology. The Oakland, California organization’s goal is to make 100,000 young black men to be the best computer coders in the world. The program focuses on giving technology skills to low-income youth.

 

http://blog.blackbusiness.org/2016/04/6-black-tech-organizations-for-young-people.html#more

Posted on April 15, 2016 By Staff With 0 comments

In the U.S., There Are 2 Million Black-Owned Businesses — And 10 Other Facts About Black Entrepreneurs

black_entrepreneurs

According to the United States Census Bureau, there are more than 2 million businesses in the country that are owned by African Americans. That statistic dispels a lot of rumors that African Americans are not successful in business. On the contrary, Black-owned businesses are a huge asset to the U.S. economy. But wait there’s more!

Here are 10 more little-known facts about Black businesses:

LOCATION:

#1 – The highest ratio of Black-owned businesses is in Washington, DC where 28% percent of ALL businesses there are owned by African Americans.

#2 – The second highest ratio of Black-owned businesses is in the state of Georgia, where 20% of ALL businesses there are Black-owned.

#3 – Although the ratio is only 10.6%, the state of New York actually has the most Black-owned firms at 204,093.

EMPLOYEES:

#4 – Of the 2 million Black businesses in the U.S., only about 107,000 of them have actual employees and they employ more than 920,000 people with a total annual payroll of about $23.9 billion.

INDUSTRIES:

#5 – Nearly 38% of Black businesses are in health care and social assistance, repair and maintenance, and personal and laundry services.

#6 – Other popular categories among Black businesses include advertising firms, auto dealerships, consulting services, restaurants, barbershops, beauty salons, and more.

TOP BUSINESSES:

#7 – World Wide Technology, a global technology consulting firm based in St Louis, MO, is the LARGEST Black-owned business in the country. Founded by entrepreneur David Steward, they post annual revenues of more than $2 billion.

#8 – There are actually many Black-owned businesses that generate millions in annual revenue. For example, Oprah Winfrey’s Harper Productions and Bob Johnson’s RLJ Companies. There is also GlobalHue, an advertising agency in Detroit, that generates more than $480 million in annual revenue; and many, many others.

WHERE IMPROVEMENT IS NEEDED:

#9 – African Americans make up more than 13% of the U.S. population, but only own 7% of the businesses.

#10 – Nearly 1.9 million of the 2 million Black-owned businesses do not have paid employees. If each of these were able to hire just one or two employees, experts say that would be a huge solution to Black unemployment.

CHECK OUT THESE CHARTS BELOW:

 

In the U.S., There Are 2 Million Black-Owned Businesses — And 10 Other Facts About Black Entrepreneurs

Source: Blog.BlackBusiness.org

Posted on December 17, 2015 By Staff

5 BLACK-OWNED BUSINESSES STILL STANDING IN FERGUSON, MISSOURI — ONE YEAR LATER

5 Black-Owned Businesses Still Standing in Ferguson, Missouri — One Year Later

cathys_kitchen_black_owned_business_ferguson_mo

Jerome and Cathy Jenkins, owners of Cathy’s Kitchen in Ferguson, MO

It has been well over a year since the shooting of 18-year old African-American Michael Brown, the unarmed teen that was gunned down by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, a northern suburb of St. Louis. Many businesses, including those owned by blacks, were destroyed in ensuing riots. But many survived, including these 5 amazing black-owned businesses:

#1 – KZK Beauty Supply – was purchased by Mr. & Mrs. Gathungu in August 2014. They knew it was a critical time in Ferguson but counted on the community viewing them as a trusted source for beauty supplies. Fear did not hold back these amazing entrepreneurs from opening their business.

#2 – Fashions R Boutique – was burned to the ground, but was able to rebuild. The business is owned by Juanita Morris. Donations from GoFundMe, an online donation platform, and others who pitched in to help, enabled Morris to re-open her 30-year-old business.

#3 – Briant Mitchell’s BKM Fitness Bootcamp – was vandalized twice, even though it is located near the Ferguson police department. With help from the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership and money from his own savings, owner Briant Mitchell keeps going and is determined to continue helping Ferguson residents live long and healthy lives.

#4 – Cathy’s Kitchen – located in downtown Ferguson, is owned by husband/wife team Jerome and Cathy Jenkins. The diner remains open, serving breakfast and lunch, but getting the former dinner crowd has been a challenge.

#5 – Sam’s Meat Market – was looted and vandalized three times, but they are open for business. It took the family-owned grocery store and meat market a year to rebuild but they celebrated with 600 pounds of barbecued ribs for their customers.

5 Black-Owned Businesses Still Standing in Ferguson, Missouri — One Year Later

To be featured on BBNomics for our #EachAndEveryFriday campaign, click here.

According to Blog.Blackbusiness.org

Posted on December 4, 2015 By Staff With 1 comment

Top 10 U.S. Cities for African American Economic Success

african_american_economic_success

 

The recession was hard on everyone, but particularly harsh on African Americans. While the median income among whites fell 11 percent during the recession years, the decline was worse among blacks — 31 percent. But the good news is that, although success varies across the country for blacks, these 10 cities are reported by Forbes to offer the best opportunities for economic success.

Top 10 U.S. Cities for African American Economic Success

  1. Atlanta, Georgia – a population growth of 49.9 percent from 2000-2013 and over 46 percent home ownership rate makes Atlanta the number one city for economic success.
  2. Raleigh, North Carolina – Raleigh’s population grew 55.9 percent in 13 years and also has a high home ownership rate of 46.7 percent.
  3. Washington, D.C. – has two factors in its favor: a high median income of $64,896, and almost half are home owners — 49.2 percent.
  4. Baltimore, Maryland – this city has had its share of problems, but it still boasts a healthy median income of $47,898 and home ownership rate of 46.2 percent.
  5. Charlotte, North Carolina – Charlotte’s population has grown almost 15 percent over the last 13 years and has a strong home ownership rate of almost 44 percent.
  6. Virginia Beach/Norfolk, Virginia – a large population growth of 34.6 percent, healthy median income of $40,677, and 43.8 percent home ownership make this city number 6 on the list.
  7. Orlando, Florida – Orlando’s population grew a whopping 58.9 percent in the last 13 years, offering much opportunity for economic success.
  8. Miami, Florida – this popular Florida spot has much to offer, including population growth and strong home ownership rates.
  9. Richmond, Virginia – has one of the highest home ownership rates at 47.8 percent, and 12.7 percent are self-employed.
  10. San Antonio, Texas – a median household income of $41,681 and strong population growth of 43.3 percent made San Antonio among the top 10.

These cities represent increasing median household incomes, large percentages of people owning their own homes, and growing populations — all of which are positive factors for African Americans as well as other business entrepreneurs to experience economic success.

Top 10 U.S. Cities for African American Economic Success

Blog.Blackbusiness.org
Read more by visiting www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2015/01/15/the-cities-where-african-americans-are-doing-the-best-economically/

Posted on October 28, 2015 By Staff With 0 comments

TOP 5 BLACK-OWNED HANDBAG BRANDS

American women spend as much as $160 on a handbag and own an average of about 11 handbags. Ten percent of women have more than 20 bags in their closet, 20 percent spend over $200 on a handbag, 8 percent spend over $400.
black_owned_handbag_brands

Check out these black-owned hand bag brands by both African and African-American designers:

#1 – Minku: Minku is considered the Hermes of Africa when it comes to handbags. They are all handmade and can take up to 50 hours to complete and are lined with repurposed items of Yoruba ceremonial dress. The Nigerian company was started by founder Kunmi in 2011 and is a family-run business.

 

#2 – ZAAF: ZAAF offers handcrafted luxury leather handbags made in Ethiopia. They are crafted with the finest materials and produced in a remote Ethiopian village. The company was founded by Abai Schulze, a remarkable CEO who is under the age of 30.

 

#3 – Gregory Sylvia: This handbag designer was co-founded by Gregory and Terri “Sylvia” Pope. The husband-wife team started their company in Charlotte, North Carolina and are known for their luxury, elegant handbags crafted from fine leather.

 

#4 – Adela Dejack: These African-inspired designer handbags are made in Kenya. Their collection of handbags, jewelry and other accessories are inspired by African shapes, textures and techniques. Designer Adèle Dejak had plenty of design experience in England and Italy before moving her company to Nairobi, Kenya in 2005.

 

#5 – Christopher Augmon: Christopher Augmon high-end luxury designer handbags are made in New York and reflect the richness of various cultures. His distinctive handbags can be found in boutiques around the United States and online at augmon.com.These designer handbags are made by many of the designers for both women and men.

 

Source

 

Order From Lakay Home Designs

Posted on September 10, 2015 By Staff

BLACK JOBS AND ACTION PLAN

BLACK JOBS & ACTION PLAN

How many Black Owned Businesses?

How many Black Owned Businesses?

Attention community leaders and organizers. Tired of protesting, marching, and organizing with little or no results? The root of most of the problems your community faces stems from racism and the lack of economic opportunities. While you can’t make a racist get some sense overnight, you can do something about economic opportunities in your community right now. Use your organizing skills to build economic independence without begging for money or help from the government or white-owned corporations.

Here’s how…

Pick a community that is predominately Black.  Take an inventory of all the businesses that exist in that community. Make note of any businesses that are missing (grocery stores with quality produce sourced from Black farmers, gas stations, construction companies, department stores, solar panel installers, banks and ethical financial services companies, private security companies, etc.). Take note of which of the existing businesses are Black-owned. Go down the list of non-Black-owned existing businesses, prioritizing businesses that sell basic necessities first (food, energy/gas, water, clothing, shelter), and start boycotting them one by one.

 

all black everything

All Black Everything

For example, if the local grocery store is not Black-owned, find a Black grocery store executive with experience running a store. Get her to help you write a business plan on how to finance, staff, and run a store. Raise money from people in the community (churches might be able to help with this if you can find a pastor that hasn’t lost his mind and sold out…very rare these days, but worth a shot). Get everyone in the community to stop shopping at that store. Provide transportation to another store temporarily if people have no alternatives. With no customers, the targeted store will quickly go out of business. If they don’t, resort to more aggressive measures to “encourage” them out of business.

Once they are ready to close the business, come in and buy it for pennies on the dollar. Re-open as a Black-owned business that is socially and environmentally responsible. Train and hire people from the community to help run the business. Use the profits from the business and community funds to help acquire the next business on the list described above and start new businesses that need to be started. Source products and raw materials from other Black-owned companies or African companies whenever possible. Repeat this process until most of the businesses in the community are Black-owned and community-owned. Use profits from those businesses to fund institutions that empower the community (free clinics, independent Afrikan-centered schools and training centers, etc), security, and infrastructure.

This plan has worked for other communities. This plan has worked for Black communities in the past. This plan will for Black people today with some updates to the current environment and learning from past mistakes. We have the knowledge and skills available in our communities. Whether Black people have the will and intestinal fortitude to go through with it is the only question. Your current so-called leaders will probably not support this. They are token leaders, put in place by people that do not care about you. Pick new leaders that have relevant experience…so no lawyers, academics, pastors, or politicians.

Now Hiring!

Now Hiring!

Finally, some people will call this strategy reverse racism. Some will call it divisive. It probably is, get over it. News Flash: Black people did not create these artificial divides…but we do have to live with them until the rest of humanity evolves to understand and practice what Black people have always understood…that we are all human and we are all connected. Every other community engages in this self-interested behavior…it just comes natural to them, so they don’t have to make it so blatant, but the result is the same. Frankly, it is sad that this has to be spelled out like this, but being politically correct apparently hasn’t worked so far.

Name calling is for children. Let the children call you whatever they want as long as they stay out of your way while you direct your own destiny. If people want to slap a label on you, then so be it. So what! If they stand in your way, remove them from your path. Grow up, stand up, and make your own way or be content working for those children for the rest of your life.

Our resources:

If you are forming a local group, please contact us Buy Black Economics.

Black Business Coaching: BLK Business

Funding Sources: BBNomics 

Crowdfunding is an effort to create a self-help approach to the funding issues BOB’s face in this current market.

BLACK JOBS AND ACTION PLAN

 

 

Posted on September 9, 2014 By Staff

LIST OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN NEIGHBORHOODS

dream big and hustle hard

List of African-American neighborhoods

This is a list of African American neighborhoods, containing cities, districts, and neighborhoods in the US that are predominantly African American, or are strongly associated with African American culture, either currently or historically.

Akron, Ohio[edit]

Albany, New York[edit]

Atlanta, Georgia[edit]

The city hosts the Atlanta University Center, the largest consortium of historically Black colleges and universities in the country.

Baltimore, Maryland[edit]

Berkeley, California[edit]

Baltimore County, Maryland[edit]

Birmingham, Alabama[edit]

Birmingham was a focal point of the civil rights movement, and where the Birmingham campaign took place.

Boston, Massachusetts[edit]

Many important black historical figures have lived in Boston and other parts of Massachusetts

Buffalo, New York[edit]

Charlotte, North Carolina[edit]

  • Biddleville
  • Clanton Park
  • Sunset
  • Tuckaseegee
  • SouthSide
  • Hidden Valley
  • SugarCreek
  • The Plaza
  • Wilson
  • West Blvd
  • East Charlotte

Chicago and Cook CountyIllinois[edit]

Chicago[edit]

The majority-black South Side of Chicago along with its adjoining majority-black South Suburbs of Chicago, constitutes the largest black-majority region of all metropolitan areas in the entire United States.

Cook County[edit]

Cincinnati, Ohio[edit]

Cleveland and Cuyahoga CountyOhio[edit]

Cleveland (East Side)[edit]

Cuyahoga County[edit]

Columbus, Ohio[edit]

Dallas and Dallas County, Texas[edit]

All of Texas

Dayton, Ohio[edit]

  • Five Oaks
  • Dayton View
  • Residence Park
  • West Dayton
  • Roosevelt/Westwood
  • Crown Point
  • Fairlane Park
  • Cornell Heights
  • University Row
  • Hawthorne Hill
  • Arlington Heights
  • Belle Vista

Decatur, Georgia[edit]

Denver, Colorado[edit]

Des Moines, Iowa[edit]

Detroit, Michigan[edit]

Here the 12th Street Riot and Detroit Race Riot (1943) took place.

Durham, North Carolina[edit]

East St. Louis, Illinois[edit]

Home of the racially charged East St. Louis Riot.

Fort Lauderdale, Florida[edit]

Fort Myers, Florida[edit]

  • Lil Pakistan (it was given that name according to local residents because the violence and crime in that area is similar to that of Pakistan)
  • Dunbar
  • East Dunbar
  • Central Fort Myers

Fort Worth, Texas[edit]

Hartford, Connecticut[edit]

Henrico County, Virginia[edit]

Houston, Texas[edit]

Indianapolis, Indiana[edit]

Jackson, Mississippi[edit]

All of Jackson

Civil rights leader Medgar Evers was based here, and was murdered as well. The Freedom Ride also visited here, as the farthest out place they went

Kansas City, Missouri[edit]

Greater Downtown

  • Beacon Hill

East Side

  • Boulevard Village
  • Dunbar
  • Ingleside
  • Ivanhoe
  • Key Coalition
  • Knoches Park
  • Leeds
  • Mount Cleveland
  • Oak Park
  • Palestine
  • Parkview
  • Santa Fe
  • Sheraton Estates
  • Vineyard
  • Vineyard Estates
  • Washington-Wheatley
  • Wendell Phillips

Midtown-Westport

Northeast

  • Forgotten Homes
  • Independence Plaza
  • Paseo West

South Kansas City

Las Vegas, Nevada[edit]

Louisville, Kentucky[edit]

Was a stop on the Underground Railroad.

Los AngelesLong Beach, and Los Angeles County, California[edit]

Los Angeles[edit]

Los Angeles County[edit]

Long Beach[edit]

Macon, Georgia[edit]

Marin County, California[edit]

Memphis, Tennessee[edit]

Miami, Florida and Miami-Dade County, Florida[edit]

The 1979 death of Arthur McDuffie at the hands of white Miami-Dade police officers led to one of the worst race riots in American history.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin[edit]

 

Minneapolis, Minnesota[edit]

Missouri City, Texas[edit]

Nashville, Tennessee[edit]

New Haven, Connecticut[edit]

List of African-American neighborhoods

Source

Posted on July 5, 2014 By Staff

Why should we start more buying clubs in black communities?

WholesaleBuyingClub2

Why should we start more buying

clubs in black communities?

There are many different reasons why one would decide to start a buying club. The motives range from controlling food sources to saving money by buying in bulk. Others include wanting to help local farmers, minimizing a product’s carbon foot print or simply yearning to get closer to the food system. This is just a small list, and the reasons vary for each buying club. We’ll see how the answer to this question impacts decisions below.

What are the different models of organization?

While the concepts behind most buying clubs are similar, their structure can vary greatly. Some models include:

  • Owner Run – In this instance, a single owner would operate the buying club as a business. Any price markup or member fees would be profit for the owner. While there could be a few part time employees, more often than not this model is a one person show.
  • Member Only Club – This type of club is generally more exclusive, sometimes even imposing a member limit. The members would be the owner, and may choose to hire employees to run the group. Member fees and markup help cover the business overhead, but the goal is maximize savings for the members.
  • Worker Co-op – Like most worker co-ops, this buying club would be comprised of a group of members, each required to volunteer a set number of hours per month. Since no one is paid, the price markups and membership fees can be kept very low and while the group enjoys bulk discounts.
  • Farm Owned – Occasionally a farm will decide to sponsor a buying club. Some sell only their products while others will also place orders with other distributors. This type of club is great if you’re looking to establish a relationship with your local producers.

There are infinite variations on the above models, but these are the basic type of buying clubs currently operating. That is one of the best things about starting your own buying club, you can feel free to pick and choose elements from each model and create something that works best for your group.

Who else, besides me, wants to be in the buying club?

Depending on where you live, this could either be an easy or difficult task. In some communities, uttering the words ‘raw milk’ could set off a three hour discussion about micro-flora and the FDA. Conversely, some towns might require an equally long discussion to explain why we would want to buy directly from farmers versus supermarkets.

Either way, below are a few ways to gauge interest in your local area:

  • Farmer’s Market – At a local farmer’s market you’re bound to be surrounded by people who take food pretty seriously. From the farmers to the patrons, strike up a conversation with a few people and see how they react. Also, depending on the rules at your local market, you might even be able to set up a stand. Bring a sign, some quarter-sheet handouts and a have a notebook ready to collect e-mail addresses.
  • Local Produce Markets – People who frequent or work at a smaller produce market might have some interesting insight into the local food scene. At the very least, you might be able to get some information on potential distributors.
  • Internet – The ‘Community’ section of Craigslist.com could prove to be useful. Publish a post explaining your plans and ask people to send along emails if they’re interested. Another site that could be useful is Meetup.com. Start a meetup group surrounding food and see if anyone’s interesting. Even if you don’t have an actual meetup, the site’s discussion tools are pretty useful.
  • Cooperative Extension – No matter how successful the prior avenues are, a phone call or meeting with your local cooperative extension would most likely prove fruitful. These people deal in the agriculture and community on a daily basis, and are always a wealth of knowledge.

What type of product (food, seeds, vitamins) do we want to buy?

Most people assume a buying club would be associated with products normally found at a supermarket, but that’s not always the case. At the very least, it can be just the beginning of a buying club’s scope. For instance, in one buying club members got together and ordered a palate of glass gallon jars. These jars were great for storing the bulk items ordered through the club. In another instance, the same group bought several dozen fermentation crocks at wholesale price. Nothing prompts the purchase of ten pounds of cabbage like a three gallon crock.

The point being, you can start with local produce from a farmer in your area. You can buy seeds in bulk for your respective gardens in the winter. Or, you can even purchase an entire animal in the spring to be split among the club’s members. What ever product you decide to buy as a group, it will inform future choices, such as…

Who can we buy these types of products from?

There are several types of distribution to consider when forming a buying club. This decision will require the group to really focus on what it’s trying to accomplish. Cheaper food for members? Getting food closer to its source? Generating more profit for the producer? These points and many others all have pros and cons.

Once the goals of the group are determined, there are three tiers of producers:

  • National Distributor – There are several national distributors that work with buying clubs. The benefits include lower prices, greater range of products, order credit plans and organization. Some of the drawbacks are non-local product sources and greater transportation distances. Also, some companies require commercial loading zones for delivery, which is something we’ll talk about more later.
  • Local Distributor – The existence of a local distributor in your area isn’t guaranteed, but there is normally at least one handling fresh produce. The pros in this case are locally sourced product, generally smaller delivery vehicles and the possibility of forming a close relationship with the company. Downsides can include less formal delivery schedules, cash on delivery (COD) requirements and large inventory fluctuations.
  • Direct from Producer – Buying the product directly from the producer is an excellent choice if possible. Not every farmer/producer is willing to deal in small quantities typical for buying clubs, but if an agreement can be reached this can lead to excellent business relationships. The plus to this arrangement is freshness of product, intimate knowledge of its source and the potential to even have a say in the product types available. Potential pitfalls range from a lack of delivery options, payment prior to delivery and inventory instability.

How do we collect member orders?

There are many ways in which clubs gather and organize member orders and they vastly range in technical requirement. Some groups get together in one place and compile the order together. Others telephone and/or email orders to one point person who then creates the order.

In more recent years, clubs have began embracing the use of Internet for this job. There are several software based options for on-line ordering and some groups even use the collaborative power of shared Google Spreadsheets. For more information on these options, please look in our Tools & Resources section.

How often do we place an order?

This can depend on needs of the buying club and the inventory of distributors. Some clubs order as often as once a week, while others order monthly or even quarterly. One scheduling detail that can be very important is being consistent on what day the order is final. It could be every Wednesday, or the first Tuesday of every month. Whatever it may be, members often find it helpful if a system is established and followed.

Where do we receive deliveries and split bulk items?

This ultimately depends on several factors, including how many people there are in your buying club, how large your orders are and who you’re ordering from. If your club is small and the distributor can deliver it to a members house, a residential living room or garage can suffice. If the club is a bit larger and/or a national distributor required a commercial loading zone you may have to consider a larger venue. Such spaces include churches, grange halls, community centers and even unused commercial spaces for lease.

Collecting and Compiling Member Orders

Depending on the size of your club, this will vary. If you’re five to ten people, simply emailing or calling in orders to a single order compiler would suffice. However, if your group is larger, you might want to consider an Internet based tool. On the simpler side of things, you could use a Google Spreadsheet and share it with all of the members. It can be useful to have a dedicated member watching this spreadsheet, in case product names, prices or orders are entered incorrectly.

If your group continues to grow, and the spreadsheet begins to hit its limits, there are several on-line software options to help manage member ordering and order compilation. Click here to see these tools under our Tools & Resources page.

Submitting the Order

This task depends on which distributor(s) you’ve decided to deal with. In some instances, faxing or calling in your order is an option, mainly with small vendors. However, a bulk of distributors will either prefer or require the order to be submitted electronically. In this realm, it’s usually either via email or an on-line form.

For example, Frontier accepts orders through an on-line ordering tool. This tool is extremely handy in that as your enter products, it will indicate if said product is in stock, back-ordered, or sold out entirely.

If you’re submitting your order by email, vendors usually prefer a spreadsheet format of some sort. Some will provide the format, others are just happy to be getting it electronically. Both the aforementioned spreadsheets and software option help take a lot of the busywork out of preparing the order for submission.

Receiving the Goods

Again, this section is dependent on the distributor. That said, you’ll almost always have to have someone meet the delivery. Be it the vendors own truck or UPS, it’s helpful to have a member available during the drop-off time window. Beyond ensuring the safety of your club’s food, you might also need to pay the delivery driver.

If possible, having multiple members at drop-off will be best. These people can help cross check the delivered items with the invoice and quickly discover any damaged or sub par items. After the delivery is complete, this small team can help organize the order and move any perishables into refrigerators or freezers.

In some clubs, these members can also begin splitting or weighing some of the items. Over time, you’ll be able to determine which products are best to do right after delivery, such as meats and/or cheeses. This may drastically help the next step of the process.

Splitting the Goods

An important part of splitting the order is giving yourself the right amount of time. This will take a couple of tries to figure out the optimal time, and is also dependent on how large the order is. For the sake of this explanation, let’s say it will take two hours to split the order.

Before you do a split, its also important to have the proper tools for the job. If there are items like flour or vegetables, you’ll need glove, scoops, bags and scales. You’ll also need a good amount of pens and markers.

Beyond the tools, you’ll also have to prepare several copies of the ‘split sheets’. These sheets list out, by product, which members purchased said product and in what quantity. Again, the on-line software tools are extremely helpful in this task. Also, if you’re using a Google spreadsheet to order, there may be scripts available for you to create split sheets.

With tools and split sheets in hand, have your splitting team meet two hours and fifteen minutes before the club pickup time. Initially, set up one or two areas with scales for weighing items, if needed. Another task is to set up a box or bag for each member’s order. Often times these can be place on chairs to avoid constant bending over. Each of these boxes should also have either the member’s name on it or their receipt, or both. This will help avoid confusion once the distribution of items begins.

In most orders there are items that need to be weighed and bagged, while others can simply be placed in the member’s box (dry beans vs. dozen of eggs). Split the group into several teams, with some weighing and bagging and the others distributing the rest of the product. As the items are placed in their proper box, it can help to check that item off of the member’s receipt. Once all of the product has been split and distributed, it is a good idea to double check everyone’s box, making sure that all items on the receipt (that were delivered) are in the box. Now you’re ready for pickup.

Managing Pickup and Checkout

Member pickup can be an extremely social, fun time. That said, it’s also important that the process is organized as multiple business transactions will occur. The longevity of your buying club may depend on financial accuracy, especially in the beginning.

If you’ve opted to place each member’s order in a box, clearly marked with their name, the member shouldn’t have any issue finding their order. It can also help to put said boxes in alphabetical order. It is important to remind everyone that they should double check their order box with their receipt. This will help prevent any issue after they leave.

For checking out, you can have one or many people taking money. Sometimes it can help to have someone trialing the line, reminding people the payment options, who to make checks out to and fielding questions. This way, once a member reaches a checkout station, they are as prepared as possible.

As mentioned before, it depends on the size of your club and your preference, but generally its a good idea to have an organized means of tracking who’s paid what? This will be invaluable in the reconciliation step, instead of trying to remember who paid with cash or a check hours or days after the fact.

Some things to keep track of are member name, amount paid, if that amount is paying for other items such as past orders or another members order. Keeping track of cash, check or credit is also helpful. If you are collecting checks, be sure to note the check number.

Once all orders have been picked up and each member checked out one final and important part is left, cleanup. Regardless of if you’re renting, borrowing or own your space, its imperative that there be people tasked with cleaning the space after pickup and checkout. If possible, its good to have these cleaners be someone other than splitters or checkout people, as those people are normally fairly tired by this point.

From there, the money must get to the person who will deposit it into the bank, and the final numbers must be shared with people in the club who’ll need them.

Reconciling the Order

This less communal step is very important to the fiscal health of your buying club. Here, you want to make sure that the amount of money that came in from your members roughly equals the amount you have paid, or will be paying the distributor. Some things to consider are products that weren’t delivered, broken or spoiled products and any price changes in products after the order was placed. There are a whole slew of other possible hang ups in the reconciliation process, but if the checkout process was organized and well recorded, it shouldn’t be anything insurmountable.

If there are any discrepancies, you’ll possibly have to contact the distributor and determine a solution and/or alter credits or debits on a member’s account. Like any business, you’ll have to determine your own threshold when dealing with losses.

Below you will find a list of Black Farmers & Manufacturers to source goods from:

Farms and Farmers: http://bbnomics.blogspot.com/2012/02/black-owned-farms-and-farmers.html

Black owned Food Manufactures: http://bbnomics.blogspot.com/2012/01/black-owned-food-manufacturer_11.html

Black Cooperative: http://blackconsumers.org/

Black Suppliers: http://www.blacksuppliers.com/

National Black Suppliers: http://www.nabssf.org/

Black Money Worldwide: http://www.blackmoney.com/

African American Dollars: http://www.africanamericandollarstore.com/store/

It’s a Black Thing: http://www.itsablackthang.com/index.htm

Waterland Fisheries: http://www.waterlandfish.com/home/

African Movies: http://www.africanmovieplace.com/store/home.php

 

Posted on December 24, 2013 By Staff

BLACK MEN WHO OWN BLACK BUSINESSES

What about our Men?

Black Men Who Own Black Businesses

Support them too on Cyber Monday

ybe contest

 

This year  BBNOMICS is compiling a list for Black Men Who Own Black Businesses on Cyber Monday, this post is  for our SUN’s who sell things or  are in business all over the web.

Black Men Who Own Black Businesses

 

Posted on November 30, 2013 By Staff

DO YOU HAVE AN IDEA FOR A BUSINESS

What is a business idea? It’s practically any idea that you have that fills a need in the marketplace, in your community, in your life, in other people’s life.  To be able to formulate a business around a single idea, follow these 6 easy-to-understand, but hard-to-do steps:

Got an idea? Now what?

Got an idea? Now what?

What is a business idea? It’s practically any idea that you have that fills a need in the marketplace, in your community, in your life, in other people’s life.  To be able to formulate a business around a single idea, follow these 6 easy-to-understand, but hard-to-do steps:

  1. Identifying your idea–What are you passionate about? Why did this idea come up in the first place? Does it follow your passion? Is it based on an event in your life worth fixing? Is it based on a need you see in your community?
  2. Dressing up your idea– Where does your idea come in contact with the potential in the marketplace?
  3. Getting personalities around your idea– Who will ultimately buy your product/service? What does she/he look like? Where do they shop? Why will they buy your product/service?
  4. Financing your idea– How much will your idea cost? Don’t be shy, look to see what look-a-likes cost and dream away at how many widgets you would sell to who and for how much? When can you go from negative to positive (the break even point)? If you have any start-up costs, what are they, for what, and who would help you fund them.
  5. Get some feedback– Now that you have a foundation of your idea, pitch it to others, anyone. Ask family and friends, other moms and dads, other enthusiasts of what you are passionate about, and your end users/customers.
  6. Iterate– Your game plan is to get enough feedback for you to iterate to one version, and turn this cycle a couple of times. The goal is to not turn your wheels and get stuck, but turn your wheels towards launching that first product/prototype/service. It doesn’t have to be perfect, just perfect enough for meeting the needs of your customers.

We are here to assist, we need more black business, you require support.

Posted on October 7, 2013 By Staff